Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Connecting the resource nexus to basic urban service provision – with a focus on water-energy interactions in New York City
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 31, 83-94 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Urban water and energy systems are crucial for sustainably meeting basic service demands in cities. This paper proposes and applies a technology-independent “reference resource-to-service system” framework for concurrent evaluation of urban water and energy system interventions and their ‘nexus’ or ‘interlinkages’. In a concrete application, data that approximate New York City conditions are used to evaluate a limited set of interventions in the residential sector, spanning from low-flow toilet shifts to extensive green roof installations. Results indicate that interventions motivated primarily by water management goals can considerably reduce energy use and contribute to mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Similarly, energy efficiency interventions can considerably reduce water use in addition to lowering emissions. However, interventions yielding the greatest reductions in energy use and emissions are not necessarily the most water conserving ones, and vice versa. Useful further research, expanding the present analysis should consider a broader set of resource interactions, towards a full climate, land, energy and water (CLEW) nexus approach. Overall, assessing the impacts, trade-offs and co-benefits from interventions in one urban resource system on others also holds promise as support for increased resource efficiency through integrated decision making.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2017. Vol. 31, 83-94 p.
Keyword [en]
Integrated resource assessment, Multi-resource impacts, New York City, Urban service provision, Urban sustainability, Water-energy nexus, Decision making, Economic and social effects, Energy efficiency, Energy utilization, Gas emissions, Greenhouse gases, Water management, Integrated resources, Multi-resource, Urban services, Water energy, Water resources
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207336DOI: 10.1016/j.scs.2017.02.007ScopusID: 2-s2.0-85014923125OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-207336DiVA: diva2:1106387
Note

QC 20170607

Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2017-06-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Engström, R. E.Howells, Mark I.Bazilian, M.Rogner, Hans-Holger
By organisation
Energy Systems Analysis
In the same journal
Sustainable cities and society
Civil Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 1 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf