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Tungsten carbide nanoparticles in simulated surface water with natural organic matter: dissolution, agglomeration, sedimentation and interaction with Daphnia magna
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2100-8864
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2017 (English)In: Environmental Science: Nano, ISSN 2051-8153, Vol. 4, no 4, 886-894 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Even though anthropogenic nano-sized tungsten carbide nanoparticles (WC NPs) have been found in the environment, there are currently no investigations on their environmental fate. This work studies the interaction between natural organic matter (NOM) and WC NPs, as well as the potential uptake by the aquatic model organism Daphnia magna. We here show that the affinity between WC NPs and humic acid or dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), which are model molecules of NOM, is very low with no observed surface adsorption. The lack of a stabilizing effect of these organic molecules, in combination with a relatively high effective density of WC NP agglomerates in humic acid, resulted in the substantial agglomeration and sedimentation of the WC NPs. A higher stability of the smaller sized WC NP agglomerates (<150 nm) means that this fraction is mobile and can be transported to other settings, suggesting that this particle fraction should be considered in further studies. The dissolution of tungsten from WC NPs was continuous and the relatively slow dissolution rate (on the order of 0.03 mg m-2 h-1) implies that particle transport will not be severely limited from a dissolution perspective. Uptake of tungsten (dissolved tungsten and WC particles) by D. magna was observed although this did not induce any acute toxic effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry , 2017. Vol. 4, no 4, 886-894 p.
National Category
Environmental Sciences Chemical Sciences Nano Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207383DOI: 10.1039/c6en00645kISI: 000399430500014ScopusID: 2-s2.0-85017559802OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-207383DiVA: diva2:1107529
Note

Funding details: ICP, Instituto Científico Pfizer; Funding details: KTH, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan; Funding text: This work is a part of the Mistra Environmental Nanosafety program, and the financial support from Mistra is greatly acknowledged. Sara Isaksson, from KTH, is acknowledged for metal release and size distribution measurements. Alexandre Barreiro Fidalgo, from KTH, is acknowledged for help with ICP measurements. Nanxuan Mei, from KTH, is acknowledged for help with ATR-IR. Dr. Justin Teeguarden, from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, USA, is acknowledged for providing the Matlab routine for the ISDD computations.

QC 20170609

Available from: 2017-06-09 Created: 2017-06-09 Last updated: 2017-06-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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