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No association between hand and foot temperature responses during local cold stress and rewarming.
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7440-2171
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. (Omgivningsfysiologi, Environmental Physiology, Centrum för Flyg- och Rymdfysiologi, Swedish aerspace Physiology Centre)
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 117, no 6, 1141-1153 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The purpose was to examine whether associations exist between temperature responses in the fingers vs. toes and hand vs. foot during local cold-water immersion and rewarming phases.

METHODS: Seventy healthy subjects (58 males, 12 females) immersed their right hand or right foot, respectively, in 8 °C water for 30 min (CWI phase), followed by a 15-min spontaneous rewarming (RW) in 25 °C air temperature.

RESULTS: Temperature was lower in the toes than the fingers during the baseline phase (27.8 ± 3.0 vs. 33.9 ± 2.5 °C, p < 0.001), parts of the CWI phase (min 20-30: 8.8 ± 0.7 vs. 9.7 ± 1.4 °C, p < 0.001), and during the RW phase (peak temperature: 22.5 ± 5.1 vs. 32.7 ± 3.6 °C, p < 0.001). Cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) was more common in the fingers than in the toes (p < 0.001). Within the first 10 min of CWI, 61% of the subjects exhibited a CIVD response in the fingers, while only 6% of the subjects had a CIVD response in the toes. There was a large variability of temperature responses both within and between extremities, and there was a weak correlation between finger- and toe temperature both during the CWI (r = 0.21, p = 0.08) and the RW phases (r = 0.26, p = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that there is generally a lower temperature in the toes than the fingers after a short time of local cold exposure and that the thermal responses of the fingers/hands are not readily transferable to the toes/foot.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017. Vol. 117, no 6, 1141-1153 p.
Keyword [en]
CIVD, Cold tolerance, Finger, Local cold injury, Rewarming, Toe, Water immersion
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-208670DOI: 10.1007/s00421-017-3601-5ISI: 000401025200008PubMedID: 28421275Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85017604399OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-208670DiVA: diva2:1107946
Note

QC 20170612

Available from: 2017-06-11 Created: 2017-06-11 Last updated: 2017-06-12Bibliographically approved

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Keramidas, Michail E.

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