Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Research Aid Revisited: a historically grounded analysis of future prospects and policy options
Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0611-7512
Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)Alternative title
Rapport 2017:07 Till Expertgruppen för Biståndsanalys (EBA) (Swedish)
Abstract [en]

This report examines the historical path as well as current tendencies of the Swedish government’s support to development research and research capacity building in low-income countries, or simply “research aid”. It also presents some ideas for future policy options.

Research aid was institutionalised in the 1970s as part of Sweden’s growing ambitions on the international development aid scene. This ambition was driven by several motives, such as international solidarity but also economic and foreign policy motives, and can be understood as part of a movement to find, and strengthen, Sweden’s geopolitical niche in the Cold War landscape. It also tapped into longer global political movements on civilisation, decolonisation and development, as well as international scientific discourses on economic growth, over-population and environmentalism. The process which led up to the establishment of SAREC (Swedish Agency for Research Cooperation with Developing Countries ) in 1975 echoed many of the ideas and initiatives at international level in the 1960s, mainly within the sphere of the United Nations, that underscored the importance of science and technology for development. In short, science and research capacity was needed to meet challenges in the South, which was seen as lagging behind in terms economic and social development level.

A Swedish framework for research aid developed in the formative period of the 1970s and early 1980s, which after that has largely persisted:

  • bilateral cooperation for capacity building based on partnerships with Swedish universities, PhD and Master education through sandwich-programmes, and infrastructure support;
  • support to global and regional research organisations, with a handful of organisations getting the bulk of the funding;
  • research in Sweden of relevance to developing countries through a science council function, where a handful of universities attract most of the funding;
  • a relatively stable funding regime with 3-4 % of government aid allocations going to research, divided into streams of 25-30% to bilateral support, 50-60% to global and regional organisations, and 10-15% to Swedish university research. In relative terms, a downward funding trend is noted over the past decade.

Right from the beginning, the outspoken aim was to take a point of departure in the needs and demands of developing countries, and to give priority to developing research capacity. Supporting political and economic independence in the South had become one of the key objectives of Swedish aid, and increasing the research capacity was well in line with this. From around 1985 the framework was largely in place, and SAREC entered a pragmatic growth phase which seems to have lasted well into the 2000s. The main framework, and the underlying thinking, in Sweden’s research aid model have since then not been substantially altered. Within the framework certain changes, adaptations and initiatives have been made to improve performance over time. Several organisational changes have taken place, notably the merging of SAREC and SIDA in 1995 and the transfer of responsibility for grants to Swedish universities from Sida to Swedish Research Council VR in 2013. Both SAREC’s and Sida’s research aid activities have enjoyed a good reputation and from what we have seen, many evaluations have been positive.

Our historical analysis exposes some contradictions in the early Swedish research aid. First: research aid was not in demand from Sweden’s partner countries in the 1970s. As Sweden’s policy of country-programming dictated that aid should only be given where there was an expressed demand for it, SAREC was formed as an independent agency in order to bypass this policy. Second: while the focus on capacity building in the South has been strong, less than 30% of the spending has gone to the bilateral programmes which make up the main platform for capacity building. And third: the impact on the Swedish research arena at large appears to have been small despite the fact that a re-orientation of research capacity in Sweden was a stated objective early on. At policy level, over the years we have seen very few attempts for a closer alignment and coordination between Sweden’s research aid and national research policy. This third contradiction has continued to be visible even after the adoption of the Policy for Global Development (PGU) in 2003, although we note some moves towards increased integration in the past few years, notably the closer involvement of VR and the recent revitalisation of the PGU.

The key questions we raise in this report are not just about why and how SAREC and Sida worked the way they did until now. They also concern how the mission of research aid can be conceived from now on. In our study, one can fairly easy discern that the Swedish model for research aid was formed to respond to certain human, developmental, scientific and political needs of the 1970s. It is also quite clear that since then, the geopolitical map as well as the global problem catalogue has changed dramatically. Essentially, the problem at hand is not any longer, at least not only, about poor countries “catching up” with the rich countries. We argue that as humankind’s challenges have become increasingly of shared and international character (climate change, global flows of refugees, security, shared natural resources etc) we need a shared regime of knowledge production, one which does not presuppose a one-way transmission of knowledge or academic know-how from Swedish or international research organisations to the poor countries.

A new model for international research collaboration is needed which goes far beyond the current scope and volume of research aid. Such collaboration, we have good reasons to believe, will benefit the global South, the entire Swedish research and innovation arena as well as the wider society, and may hold potential for increasing Sweden’s competitiveness in the - more sustainable - future.  We propose that such a new and wider model for collaboration is built on the understanding of a world where problems and challenges are shared, although unevenly and unpredictably distributed. In this world, the production and distribution of wealth and its environmental, health and social consequences is rapidly becoming a more critical and pervasive concern than the remaining and clearly deeply distressing cases of poverty. Building capacity in the global South will for the foreseeable future continue to be an important task. But in this current world the research agenda should be increasingly shaped by managing and mitigating the risks following from wealth creation and how it affects the very idea of development in the twenty-first century. The question of wealth is rather unconventional for development aid, but it must be asked seriously in a world where economic growth is spreading and technology-driven on a pace that seems to continue unabated. How can global wealth become sustainable and at the same time be promoted and grow in low-income countries? Taking this question seriously and carving out a responsible way forward would imply an increased attention on a new set of issues. We suggest that it is high time for a revitalised and bold discussion regarding Sweden’s future role in knowledge development in the global South, which could take its point of departure in the following propositions:

Challenges and problems are shared. Moving away from the notion of ‘development’ as an issue for the global South, today’s and tomorrow’s global problems affect also the global North. As we now increasingly take stock of a supercomplex world, the idea of research aid will have to change.

Global challenges are local. In dealing with local and regional manifestations of the broader, often global challenges, it may be called for research aid to take a different form, engaging researchers and institutions in the developing world in broader constellations.

Wealth is becoming a greater problem than poverty. While the 2030 agenda to eliminate poverty must continue, the questions of transgression of planetary boundaries, environmental justice, wealth and welfare distribution open up vast new fields of global enquiry. Future research aid would take as its cue the challenges rising in a world with much less poverty and much more wealth.

Research agendas should be formed in dialogue. Common agendas need to be reconsidered in a South-North dialogue supported by new alliances of change agents in universities, funding agencies, the business community, recipient countries, international fora, in civil society, and the EU.   

The knowledge base is widening. Integrative and challenge-driven approaches bridging multiple disciplines, including the social sciences and humanities, that have hitherto played marginal roles in research aid, are needed to deal with the supercomplexity challenges of the emerging world order.

Institutions remain essential. The research capacity of institutional actors such as universities is set to be a critical lever for low-income countries to participate in, and benefit from, the massively expanding global knowledge production. Sweden can here build upon its sustained track record of supporting institution building in the South.

Change of scale is required. The massive challenges we are facing at combined planetary, regional and local scales require responses of a completely different scale and character than what aid has been able to muster within the - predominantly nation-based – paradigm of development aid.

Research aid should be linked closer to knowledge and research policy at large. Research aid can just be one small part of a wider agenda to address global challenges, implying a much closer alignment between research policy and research aid. History demonstrates the difficulties of effecting this alignment, which now prompts an organized re-thinking, a re-structuring of funding streams, and a re-engagement within the domain of politics. 

Abstract [sv]

I den här rapporten undersöks den svenska regeringens tidigare och nuvarande inriktning för stöd till utvecklingsforskning och kapacitetsuppbyggnad för forskning i låginkomstländer, eller kort och gott ”forskningsbistånd”. Dessutom presenteras några förslag till framtida politiska alternativ.

På 1970-talet institutionaliserades forskningsbiståndet som en del av Sveriges allt större ambitioner inom det internationella utvecklingsbiståndet. Motiven var flera, bl.a. internationell solidaritet men det fanns även ekonomiska och utrikespolitiska motiv och ambitionen kan ses som ett led i en strävan att hitta och stärka Sveriges plats på den geopolitiska kartan under det kalla kriget. Den passade även in i långsiktiga globala politiska ansträngningar för att skapa en civiliserad värld, avkolonisering och utveckling, och för att forma internationella vetenskapliga diskurser om ekonomisk tillväxt, överbefolkning och miljövård. Processen ledde fram till att Styrelsen för u-landsforskning (SAREC, Swedish Agency for Research Cooperation with Developing Countries) inrättades 1975. Avstampet var olika internationella idéer och initiativ från 1960-talet, huvudsakligen inom ramen för Förenta nationerna, som betonade vetenskapens och teknikens betydelse för utveckling. Det stod klart att det södra halvklotet halkade efter när det gällde ekonomisk och social utveckling och det krävdes vetenskap och forskning för att möta dessa utmaningar.

Under 1970-talet och början av 1980-talet utvecklades en svensk ram för forskningsbistånd och den har i sina huvuddrag kvarstått sedan dess:

  • Bilaterala samarbeten om kapacitetsuppbyggande baserade på partnerskap med svenska universitet, infrastrukturstöd och utbytesprogram inom doktor- och masterutbildningar.
  • Stöd till globala och regionala forskningsorganisationer, med en handfull organisationer som tilldelas huvuddelen av finansieringen.
  • Stöd till forskning i Sverige som är av betydelse för utvecklingsländer, via ett vetenskapligt råd, där ett fåtal universitet får den huvudsakliga delen av finansieringen.
  • En relativt stabil finansieringsmodell där 3–4 procent av det statliga biståndet går till forskning, uppdelat i grupper om 25–30 procent till bilateralt stöd, 50–60 procent till globala och regionala organisationer och 10–15 procent till forskning vid svenska universitet. I relativa termer har det noterats en nedåtgående trend vad gäller finansiering under det senaste decenniet.

Den uttalade målsättningen var redan från början att utgå från utvecklingsländernas behov och krav, och att prioritera utvecklingen av forskningskapacitet. Att stödja en politisk och ekonomisk självständighet i det globala Syd hade kommit att bli ett av huvudmålen för det svenska biståndet och förstärkt forskningskapacitet låg väl i linje med detta. Ramen var till stora delar på plats 1985 då SAREC gick in i en tillväxtfas som tycks ha varat till långt in på 2000-talet. Den huvudsakliga ramen och tanken bakom den svenska modellen för forskningsbiståndet har till stora delar behållits sedan dess. Under åren har ramen anpassats och det har tillkommit initiativ för att förbättra resultatet. Det har skett flera organisatoriska förändringar. 1995 slogs SAREC och Sida samman och 2013 överfördes ansvaret för anslag till svenska universitet från Sida till Vetenskapsrådet. Forskningsbiståndet från både SAREC och Sida har haft ett gott rykte och det har förekommit många positiva utvärderingar.

Vår historiska analys pekar på vissa motsägelser i det tidiga svenska forskningsbiståndet. För det första fanns det under 1970-talet ingen efterfrågan på forskningsbistånd bland Sveriges partnerländer. Till följd av att politiken för den svenska biståndsplaneringen utformades land för land och att den fastställde att bistånd fick ges om det fanns ett uttalat förslag skapades SAREC som ett oberoende organ i syfte att kringgå denna politik. För det andra har mindre än 30 procent av medlen gått till de bilaterala program som utgör den viktigaste plattformen för kapacitetsuppbyggandet trots att det funnits ett starkt fokus på kapacitetsbyggnad på det södra halvklotet. Och för det tredje så förefaller effekterna inom den svenska forskningen ha varit små, trots att en nyorientering av de svenska forskningsresurserna tidigt var ett uttalat mål. På politisk nivå har det under åren förekommit väldigt få försök att åstadkomma en närmare anpassning och samordning mellan Sveriges forskningsbistånd och den nationella forskningspolitiken. Den här tredje motsägelsen har fortsatt att vara noterbar även efter att politiken för global utveckling (PGU) antogs 2003. Det går dock att se vissa steg mot en ökad integration under de senaste åren, särskilt en ökad medverkan av Vetenskapsrådet och den senaste förnyelsen av PGU.

I den här rapporten tar vi upp flera viktiga frågor förutom varför och hur SAREC och Sida har arbetat fram till idag. Vi berör även den framtida utformningen av uppdraget för forskningsbistånd. I studien framgår det förhållandevis tydligt att den svenska forskningsbiståndsmodellen har utformats som svar på vissa mänskliga, utvecklingsmässiga, vetenskapliga och politiska behov under 1970-talet. Det är även tydligt att både den geopolitiska kartan och de globala utmaningarna har förändrats dramatiskt sedan dess. Idag är problemet inte längre, åtminstone inte enbart, att de fattiga länderna behöver ”hinna ikapp” de rika länderna. Vi menar att eftersom mänsklighetens utmaningar i allt högre grad är gemensamma och av internationell art (klimatförändringar, globala flyktingströmmar, säkerhet, gemensamma naturresurser osv.) så behöver vi en gemensam modell för kunskapsproduktion som inte förutsätter en enkelriktad överföring av kunskap eller akademiskt kunnande från svenska eller internationella forskningsorganisationer till de fattiga länderna.

Det behövs en ny modell för internationellt forskningssamarbete, som går långt utöver forskningsbiståndets nuvarande omfattning och volym. Vi har goda skäl att tro att sådana samarbeten kan gynna hela det södra halvklotet och den svenska forsknings- och innovationsarenan liksom samhället i stort, och att de dessutom kan bidra till att öka Sveriges konkurrenskraft i en mer hållbar framtid.  Vi föreslår att en sådan ny och bredare samverkansmodell ska byggas på en världssyn där problem och utmaningar är gemensamma, även om de är ojämnt och slumpmässigt fördelade. I dagens värld har produktionen och fördelningen av välståndet och dess miljömässiga, hälsomässiga och sociala konsekvenser blivit ett allt viktigare och mer genomgripande problem än de kvarvarande, men ändå allvarliga, fallen av fattigdom.

Kapacitetsuppbyggnad på det södra halvklotet kommer fortsatt att vara en viktig uppgift under överskådlig framtid. Men i dagens värld bör forskningsagendan alltmer formas utifrån hur man ska hantera och ta itu med de risker som följer av att välstånd skapas och hur detta påverkar synen på utveckling på 2000-talet. Frågan om välstånd är ganska okonventionell inom utvecklingsbiståndet men den måste även ställas på allvar i en värld där den ekonomiska tillväxten förefaller spridas i oförminskad takt och vara teknikdriven. Hur kan vi skapa ett globalt välstånd som är hållbart och som samtidigt kan främjas och öka i låginkomstländer? Om vi ska ta den frågan på allvar och hitta ett ansvarsfullt sätt att gå vidare så måste vi fokusera på en helt ny problemuppsättning. Vi menar att det är hög tid att föra en förnyad och uppriktig diskussion om hur Sverige ska delta i kunskapsutvecklingen på det södra halvklotet. Diskussionen kan ta utgångspunkt i följande påståenden:

Utmaningar och problem är gemensamma. Det är dags att lämna uppfattningen att ”utveckling” är en fråga för det södra halvklotet. Dagens och morgondagens globala problem påverkar även det norra halvklotet. I dagens alltmer komplicerade värld måste idén om forskningsbistånd förändras.

Globala utmaningar är lokala. När breda och ofta globala utmaningar uppträder på lokal och regional nivå kan forskningsbiståndet behöva ta en annan form och förändras så att forskare och institutioner i utvecklingsländerna involveras i bredare konstellationer.

Välstånd är på väg att bli ett större problem än fattigdom. Även om arbetet med Agenda 2030 för att eliminera fattigdomen måste fortsätta öppnar frågor om överutnyttjandet av vår planet, miljörättvisa, välstånd och välfärdsfördelning för nya internationella undersökningsområden. Framtidens forskningsbistånd kan behöva utgå från utmaningar som uppstår i en värld med mycket mer välstånd och mindre fattigdom.

Forskningsagendor bör utformas i dialog. Gemensamma agendor måste åter övervägas inom ramen för dialogen mellan nord och syd med stöd av nya och förändringsbenägna aktörer inom universitet, finansieringsorgan, näringsliv, mottagarländer, internationella fora, det civila samhället och EU.   

Kunskapsbasen bör breddas. Integrerade och utmaningsdrivna angreppssätt som spänner över flera discipliner, b.la. samhällsvetenskap och humaniora, och som hittills har spelat en marginell roll i forskningsbiståndet, behövs för att ta itu med den nya världsordningens mycket komplicerade utmaningar.

Institutioner är fortsatt viktiga. Forskningskapaciteten bland institutioner, som till exempel universitet, kommer att spela en viktig roll för att få låginkomstländer att delta och dra nytta av den växande globala kunskapsproduktionen. Här kan Sverige bygga vidare på sina gedigna resultat när det gäller att stödja institutionsuppbyggnad på det södra halvklotet.

Skalan måste ändras. De stora utmaningar som vi står inför på global, regional och lokal nivå kräver åtgärder i en helt annan omfattning och av en helt annan art, bland annat genom internationella samarbeten, än vad som har kunnat åstadkommas med bistånd i den – övervägande nationsbaserade – modellen för utvecklingsstöd.

Forskningsbiståndet bör ges en närmare koppling till kunskaps- och forskningspolitiken i stort. Forskningsbiståndet kan vara en del av en bredare agenda för att hantera globala utmaningar, vilket skulle inbegripa en mycket närmare koppling mellan forskningspolitik och forskningsbistånd. Historiskt sett har denna koppling varit svår att åstadkomma. Av den anledningen krävs nya tänkesätt, en omstrukturering av finansieringen och dess källor samt nya politiska åtaganden.

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Expertgruppen för Biståndsanalys , 2017. , p. 133
Keywords [en]
aid, research, science, development cooperation, developing countries
National Category
History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-209033ISBN: 978-91-88143-29-7 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-209033DiVA, id: diva2:1109940
Note

QC 20170616

Available from: 2017-06-14 Created: 2017-06-14 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

EBA homepage

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nilsson, DavidSörlin, Sverker
By organisation
History of Science, Technology and Environment
History

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 483 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf