Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Examining the relationships between individual's time use and activity participations with their health indicators
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7124-7164
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6966-9077
2017 (English)In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 9, no 2, 26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Using a three-week household activity-travel survey, this paper explores the relationship between individuals’ self-reported physical, mental and social health conditions and their time allocation for different types of in-home and out-of-home time activities. Methods: A path model is developed to investigate the roles of activity-travel time use on the self-reported health conditions, while the socio-demographics and residential environment characteristics are also considered. Results: The model results reveal heterogeneous impacts of different types of activities and intensities on individual’s self-reported health conditions. This study, however, did not find evidence of positive relationship between cycling and walking and self-reported physical health condition, which has been found in many developed countries. Presumably this is because in developing countries like Indonesia the individuals who walk and cycle are likely to be a part of economically disadvantaged groups who have less awareness to their own health conditions. Conclusion: Beside activity and travel time use factors, age and working status were found significantly affecting the self-reported health conditions, regardless of respondents’ gender and income. Neighbourhood characteristics, such as population density, are also found positively correlated to self-reported respondents’ physical, social and mental health conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017. Vol. 9, no 2, 26
Keyword [en]
Day-to-day variability, In-home and out-of-home activity participations, Indonesia, Physical mental and social health indicators
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-209595DOI: 10.1007/s12544-017-0243-yISI: 000403711800015Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85019018365OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-209595DiVA: diva2:1113922
Note

QC 20170622

Available from: 2017-06-22 Created: 2017-06-22 Last updated: 2017-07-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Susilo, Yusak O.Liu, Chengxi
By organisation
System Analysis and EconomicsTransport Planning, Economics and Engineering
In the same journal
European Transport Research Review
Civil Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 10 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf