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Association of drivers’ sleepiness with heart rate variability: A pilot study with drivers on real roads
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6995-967X
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2017 (English)In: EMBEC & NBC 2017, Springer, 2017, Vol. 65, p. 149-152Conference paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Vehicle crashes lead to huge economic and social consequences, and one non-negligible cause of accident is driver sleepiness. Driver sleepiness analysis based on the monitoring of vehicle acceleration, steering and deviation from the road or physiological and behavioral monitoring of the driver, e.g., monitoring of yawning, head pose, eye blinks and eye closures, electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, electromyogram and electrocardiogram (ECG), have been used as a part of sleepiness alert systems. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a potential method for monitoring of driver sleepiness. Despite previous positive reports from the use of HRV for sleepiness detection, results are often inconsistent between studies. In this work, we have re-evaluated the feasibility of using HRV for detecting drivers’ sleepiness during real road driving. A database consists of ECG measurements from 10 drivers, driving during morning, afternoon and night sessions on real road were used. Drivers have reported their average sleepiness level by using the Karolinska sleepiness scale once every five minutes. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the potential of HRV indexes to distinguish between alert, first signs of sleepiness and severe sleepiness states. The results suggest that individual subjects show different reactions to sleepiness, which produces an individual change in HRV indicators. The results motivate future work for more personalized approaches in sleepiness detection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017. Vol. 65, p. 149-152
Series
IFMBE Proceedings, ISSN 1680-0737 ; 65
Keywords [en]
Heart rate variability, Karolinska sleepiness scale, Personalization, Sleepiness
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-212014DOI: 10.1007/978-981-10-5122-7_38Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85021750920ISBN: 9789811051210 OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-212014DiVA, id: diva2:1133370
Conference
Joint Conference of the European Medical and Biological Engineering Conference, EMBEC 2017 and Nordic-Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics, NBC 2107, Tampere, Finland, 11 June 2017 through 15 June 2017
Funder
VINNOVA
Note

QC 20170815

Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2017-08-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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