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Symptoms of depression and their relation to myocardial infarction and periodontitis
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 468-474Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Psychosocial stress and depression are established risk factors for cardiovascular disease and a relationship to periodontitis has been suggested. We studied symptoms of depression and their relation to myocardial infarction and periodontitis. Methods: In a Swedish case-control study, 805 patients, <75 years with a first myocardial infarction and 805 controls without myocardial infarction were matched for age, gender and geographic area. Mean age was 62±8 years and 81% were male. Standardised physical examination and dental panoramic X-ray for grading of periodontal status was performed. Medical history including risk factors related to cardiovascular disease and periodontitis was collected as was detailed information on perceived stress at home and work, and symptoms of depression (Montgomery Åsberg Depression Scale). A Montgomery Åsberg Depression Scale score ≥13 was considered clinically relevant. Results: A family history of cardiovascular disease, smoking and divorce was more frequent among patients than controls. Patients had more symptoms of depression than controls (14 vs 7%; p<0.001) but received less anti-depressive treatment (16 vs 42%; p<0.001). Symptoms of depression doubled the risk for myocardial infarction (Montgomery Åsberg Depression Scale: odds ratio 2.17 (95% confidence interval 1.41-3.34)). There was no difference in symptoms of depression between study participants with and without periodontitis. Conclusion: Patients with a first myocardial infarction were more frequently depressed than matched controls without myocardial infarction, but received less anti-depressive treatment. A relationship between depression and periodontitis could not be confirmed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017. Vol. 16, no 6, p. 468-474
Keywords [en]
Cardiovascular disease, dental health, psychosocial stress, risk factors
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-212275DOI: 10.1177/1474515116686462ISI: 000411496500003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85026532404OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-212275DiVA, id: diva2:1133859
Funder
AFA InsuranceSwedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Research Council
Note

QC 20170818

Available from: 2017-08-17 Created: 2017-08-17 Last updated: 2017-10-16Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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Output format
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