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Climate-change and health effects of using rice husk for biochar-compost: Comparing three pyrolysis systems
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management. Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation, Poland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8101-8928
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 162, 260-272 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study presents a comparative analysis of the environmental impacts of different biochar-compost (COMBI) systems in North Vietnam relative to the conventional practice of open burning of rice husks. Three COMBI systems, using different pyrolysis technologies (pyrolytic cook-stove, brick kiln and the BigChar 2200 unit) for conversion of rice husk into biochar were modelled. Biochar was assumed to be composted with manure and straw, and the biochar-compost produced from each system was assumed to be applied to paddy rice fields. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) showed that the three COMBI systems significantly improved environmental and health impacts of rice husk management in spring and summer compared with open burning, in terms of climate change, particulate matter (PM) and human toxicity (HT) impacts. The differences between the three COMBI systems in the climate change and PM impacts were not significant, possibly due to the large uncertainties. In all systems, the suppression of soil CH4 emissions is the major contributor to the reduced climate effect for the COMBI systems, comprising 56% in spring and 40% in summer. The greatest reduction in the HT impact was offered by the BigChar 2200 system, where biochar is produced in a large-scale plant in which pyrolysis gases are used to generate heat rather than released into the atmosphere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 162, 260-272 p.
Keyword [en]
Biochar, Compost, Methane emissions, Paddy rice, Pyrolysis gases
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-212228DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.06.026Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85024131731OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-212228DiVA: diva2:1134647
Note

QC 20170821

Available from: 2017-08-21 Created: 2017-08-21 Last updated: 2017-08-21Bibliographically approved

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