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The Radio Baton as configurable musical instrument and controller
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3086-0322
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4259-484X
2003 (English)In: Proc. Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference, 2003, Vol. 2, p. 689-691Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Max Mathews radio baton (RB) has been produced in about 40 pieces until today. It has usually been applied as an orchestra conducting system, as interactive music composition controller using typical percussionist gestures, and as a controller for sound synthesis models. In the framework of the Sounding Object EU founded project, the RB has found new applications scenarios. Three applications were based on this controller. This was achieved by changing the gesture controls. Instead of the default batons, a new radio sender that fits the fingertips was developed. This new radio sender allows musicians’ interaction based on hand gestures and it can also fit different devices. A Pd model of DJ scratching techniques (submitted to SMAC03) was controlled with the RB and the fingertip radio sender. This controller allows DJs a direct control of sampled sounds maintaining hand gestures similar to those used on vinyl. The sound model of a bodhran (submitted to SMAC03) was controlled with a traditional playing approach. The RB was controlled with a traditional bodhran double beater with one fingertip radio sender at each end. This allowed detection of the beater position on the RB surface, the surfaced corresponding to the membrane in the sound model. In a third application the fingertip controller was used to move a virtual ball rolling along the elastic surface of a box placed over the surface of the RB. The DJ console and the virtual bodhran were played in concerts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 2, p. 689-691
Keywords [en]
gestural controllers, haptic feedback, multi-modal, non-haptic feedback, scratching, physics-based modeling, pure data
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-215169OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-215169DiVA, id: diva2:1146772
Conference
Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference
Note

interface. QCR 20171009

Available from: 2017-10-03 Created: 2017-10-03 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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