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Numerical eduction of active multi-port data for in-duct obstructions
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 411, p. 328-345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A numerical method for aeroacoustic source characterization of in-duct components at frequencies beyond the cut-on frequencies of several acoustic modes is presented. Assuming linearity and time invariance, any ducted component can be fully characterized using a network (multi-port) model including source strength and scattering. A two-step multi-source approach is applied to numerical data in order to educe the multi-port characteristics. First, a scale resolving compressible flow simulation, here the Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (IDDES), is run to compute the channel flow that also contains the acoustic sources. Second, a linear acoustic computation, here the Linearized Navier Stokes Equations (LNSE), around a mean flow is solved for different acoustic loads to determine the component's scattering. The work uncovers the high potential of two-step numerical multi-port eduction methods. Particularly, it is shown that the acoustic source power spectra can be accurately extracted from IDDES data and the total acoustic power prediction is very good. Furthermore, a good result in the scattering data obtained from a second computationally inexpensive LNSE computation is achieved. The approach is interesting when describing mid-size duct systems, for example ventilation systems in aircraft and buildings, with a moderate number of higher order modes propagating in the considered frequency range. Therefore, the increasing availability of compressible flow data opens a wide field of applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2017. Vol. 411, p. 328-345
Keywords [en]
Multi-ports, Aeroacoustic, Duct acoustic, Linearized Navier Stokes, IDDES, Source, Orifice, Computational method, Turbulence modeling, Network modeling, Scattering
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-217163DOI: 10.1016/j.jsv.2017.09.012ISI: 000413119800020Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85031752595OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-217163DiVA, id: diva2:1154980
Note

QC 20171106

Available from: 2017-11-06 Created: 2017-11-06 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved

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