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Biogas in the transport sector—actor and policy analysis focusing on the demand side in the Stockholm region
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4321-6894
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
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2018 (English)In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 129, 70-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sweden has ambitions to phase out fossil fuels and significantly increase the share of biofuels it uses. This article focuses on Stockholm County and biogas, with the aim to increase the knowledge about regional preconditions. Biogas-related actors have been interviewed, focusing on the demand side. Biogas solutions play an essential role, especially regarding bus transports and taxis. Long-term development has created well-functioning socio-technical systems involving collaboration. However, uncertainties about demand and policy cause hesitation and signs of stagnating development. Public organizations are key actors regarding renewables. For example, Stockholm Public Transport procures biogas matching the production at municipal wastewater treatment plants, the state-owned company Swedavia steers via a queuing system for taxis, and the municipalities have shifted to “environmental cars”. There is a large interest in electric vehicles, which is expected to increase significantly, partially due to suggested national policy support. The future role of biogas will be affected by how such an expansion comes about. There might be a risk of electricity replacing biogas, making it more challenging to reach a fossil-free vehicle fleet. Policy issues strongly influence the development. The environmental car definition is of importance, but its limited focus fails to account for several different types of relevant effects. The dynamic policy landscape with uncertainties about decision makers’ views on biogas seems to be one important reason behind the decreased pace of development. A national, long-term strategy is missing. Both the European Union and Sweden have high ambitions regarding a bio-based and circular economy, which should favor biogas solutions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 129, 70-80 p.
Keyword [en]
Biogas, Policy instrument, Socio-technical system, Stockholm, Transition, Transport
National Category
Energy Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-217543DOI: 10.1016/j.resconrec.2017.10.010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85032860776OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-217543DiVA: diva2:1157477
Note

QC 20171116

Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-16Bibliographically approved

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