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An Experiment in Ethiopia: The Chilalo Agricultural Development Unit and Swedish Development Aid to Haile Selassie’s Ethiopia, 1964–1974
Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
2017 (English)In: Comparativ: Zeitschrift für Globalgeschichte und vergleichende Gesellschaftsforschung, ISSN 0940-3566, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 54-74Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines a Swedish-led integrated rural development project, the Chilalo Agricultural Development Unit (CADU) in Ethiopia’s Arussi province. Designed by a group of experts from the Agricultural College of Sweden, CADU was the first significant Swedish attempt at transferring agronomical knowledge to the global South in the context of development aid. It intended to generate socio-economic development through a broad range of efforts, but with the core of the project being agricultural experimentation geared towards increasing small-farm production of cereal crops.

A defining feature of CADU was that its development and technology transfer strategy came to be deeply connected to techno-scientific traditions at the Agricultural College. This meant that its strategies reflected a Swedish national style of agricultural development that was characterized by strong attention to local agricultural environments but a limited sensitivity toward social factors. The attention to the local contributed to making it one of the few really effective implementations of the Green Revolution technologies in Africa in its time, while the comparative lack of attention to social factors resulted in mixed peasant response and in social inequalities being exacerbated as an effect of the project’s activities. As a result of its focus on poor peasants in the increasingly tense environment of late-imperial Ethiopia, CADU also developed into a politically highly charged project and became an active party in the rural conflicts that preceded the revolution of 1974.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 27, no 2, p. 54-74
National Category
History
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-217870OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-217870DiVA, id: diva2:1158128
Note

QC 20171211

Available from: 2017-11-17 Created: 2017-11-17 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf