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Nudging and Boosting: Steering or Empowering Good Decisions
Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
2017 (English)In: Perspectives on Psychological Science, ISSN 1745-6916, E-ISSN 1745-6924, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 973-986Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, policy makers worldwide have begun to acknowledge the potential value of insights from psychology and behavioral economics into how people make decisions. These insights can inform the design of nonregulatory and nonmonetary policy interventionsas well as more traditional fiscal and coercive measures. To date, much of the discussion of behaviorally informed approaches has emphasized "nudges," that is, interventions designed to steer people in a particular direction while preserving their freedom of choice. Yet behavioral science also provides support for a distinct kind of nonfiscal and noncoercive intervention, namely, 'boosts." The objective of boosts is to foster people's competence to make their own choicesthat is, to exercise their own choices-that is to, excrecise agency. Building on this distinction, we further elaborate on how boosts are conceptually distinct from nudges: The two kinds of interventions differ with respect to (a) their immediate intervention targets, (b) their roots in different research programs, (c) the causal pathways through which they affect behavior, (d) their assumptions about human cognitive architecture, (e) the reversibility of their effects, (f) their programmatic ambitions, and (g) their normative implications. We discuss each of these dimensions, provide an initial taxonomy of boosts, and address some possible misconceptions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017. Vol. 12, no 6, p. 973-986
Keywords [en]
boost, nudge, choice architecture, education, public policy, autonomy, welfare
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-219337DOI: 10.1177/1745691617702496ISI: 000415840500003PubMedID: 28792862Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85034430753OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-219337DiVA, id: diva2:1162390
Note

QC 20171204

Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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