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Data-driven analysis of nutrient inputs and transfers through nested catchments
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Department of Physical Geography and the Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Applied Hydraulics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Geodesy, University of Split, Split, Croatia.
2018 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 610-611, 482-494 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A data-driven screening methodology is developed for estimating nutrient input and retention-delivery in catchments with measured water discharges and nutrient concentrations along the river network. The methodology is applied to the Sava River Catchment (SRC), a major transboundary catchment in southeast Europe, with seven monitoring stations along the main river, defining seven nested catchments and seven incremental subcatchments that are analysed and compared in this study. For the relatively large nested catchments (> 40,000 km2), characteristic regional values emerge for nutrient input per unit area of around 30 T/yr/km2 for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and 2 T/yr/km2 for total phosphorus (TP). For the smaller nested catchments and incremental subcatchments, corresponding values fluctuate and indicate hotspot areas with total nutrient inputs of 158 T/yr/km2 for DIN and 13 T/yr/km2 for TP. The delivered fraction of total nutrient input mass (termed delivery factor) and associated nutrient loads per area are scale-dependent, exhibiting power-law decay with increasing catchment area, with exponents of around 0.2–0.3 for DIN and 0.3–0.5 for TP. For the largest of the nested catchments in the SRC, the delivery factor is around 0.08 for DIN and 0.03 for TP. Overall, the nutrient data for nested catchments within the SRC show consistency with previously reported data for multiple nested catchments within the Baltic Sea Drainage Basin, identifying close nutrient relationships to driving hydro-climatic conditions (runoff for nutrient loads) and socio-economic conditions (population density and farmland share for nutrient concentrations). 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V. , 2018. Vol. 610-611, 482-494 p.
Keyword [en]
Dissolved inorganic nitrogen, Nutrient input, Nutrient load, Nutrient retention-delivery, Sava River Catchment, Total phosphorus, Nitrogen, Nutrients, Phosphorus, Population statistics, Rivers, Runoff, Water pollution control, Dissolved inorganic nitrogens, Nutrient inputs, Nutrient loads, Nutrient retention, River catchment, Catchments
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-216807DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.003ISI: 000411897700049Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85027401440OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-216807DiVA: diva2:1162772
Note

Export Date: 24 October 2017; Article; CODEN: STEVA; Correspondence Address: Levi, L.; Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering (SEED), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)Sweden; email: llevi@kth.se; Funding details: 2009-3221, VR, Vetenskapsrådet; Funding details: 2014-43, Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas; Funding text: This work has been supported by funding from the Swedish Research Council (VR, project number 2009-3221) and The Swedish Research Council Formas (project number 2014-43). We thank Martina Baučić from the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Geodesy, University of Split, Croatia and Liangchao Zou from the Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden. We also thank Gordana Bušelić from the Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service as well as Hrvatske Vode Institute and Institute Jaroslav Černi for providing data that were needed for this study. The data used are listed in the tables and references of this manuscript. QC 20171205

Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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