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New constraints on Ganymede's hydrogen corona: Analysis of Lyman-alpha emissions observed by HST/STIS between 1998 and 2014
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2422-5426
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2017 (English)In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 148, p. 35-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Far-ultraviolet observations of Ganymede's atmospheric emissions were obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) onboard of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on several occasions between 1998 and 2014. We analyze the Lyman-alpha emission from four HST campaigns in order to constrain the abundance and variation of atomic hydrogen in Ganymede's atmosphere. We apply a forward model that estimates surface reflection and resonant scattering in an escaping corona of the solar Lyman-alpha flux, taking into account the effects of the hydrogen in the interplanetary medium. The atmospheric emissions around Ganymede's disk derived for the observations taken between 1998 and 2011 are consistent with a hydrogen corona in the density range of (5-8) x 10(3) cm(-3) at the surface. The hydrogen density appears to be generally stable in that period. In 2014, Ganymede's corona brightness is approximately 3 times lower during two observations of Ganymede's trailing hemisphere and hardly detectable at all during two observations of the leading hemisphere. We also investigate extinction of Ganymede's coronal emissions in the Earth's upper atmosphere or geocorona. For small Doppler shifts, resonant scattering in the geocorona of the moon corona emissions can effectively reduce the brightness observed by HST. In the case of the 2014 leading hemisphere observations, an estimated extinction of 80% might explain the non-detection of Ganymede's hydrogen corona. Geocoronal extinction might also explain a previously detected hemispheric difference from Callisto's hydrogen corona.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 148, p. 35-44
Keywords [en]
Ganymede, Atomic hydrogen, Corona, Hubble Space Telescope observations
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-219505DOI: 10.1016/j.pss.2017.10.006ISI: 000415775900004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85031759162OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-219505DiVA, id: diva2:1163988
Note

QC 20171208

Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved

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Alday, JuanIvchenko, Nickolay

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