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The Effects of Musical Experience and Hearing Loss on Solving an Audio-Based Gaming Task
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4259-484X
Industrial Technology Department, Tsukuba University of Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2555-650X
2017 (English)In: Applied Sciences, ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 7, no 12, 1278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We conducted an experiment using a purposefully designed audio-based game called the Music Puzzle with Japanese university students with different levels of hearing acuity and experience with music in order to determine the effects of these factors on solving such games. A group of hearing-impaired students (n = 12) was compared with two hearing control groups with the additional characteristic of having high (n = 12) or low (n = 12) engagement in musical activities. The game was played with three sound sets or modes; speech, music, and a mix of the two. The results showed that people with hearing loss had longer processing times for sounds when playing the game. Solving the game task in the speech mode was found particularly difficult for the group with hearing loss, and while they found the game difficult in general, they expressed a fondness for the game and a preference for music. Participants with less musical experience showed difficulties in playing the game with musical material. We were able to explain the impacts of hearing acuity and musical experience; furthermore, we can promote this kind of tool as a viable way to train hearing by focused listening to sound, particularly with music.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland, 2017. Vol. 7, no 12, 1278
Keyword [en]
audio games; educational tools; audio signal processing; computer interfaces; music cognition; perception; training; language
National Category
Media and Communication Technology Human Computer Interaction Music
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction; Technology and Health; Media Technology; Art, Technology and Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-219778DOI: 10.3390/app7121278OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-219778DiVA: diva2:1165325
Note

JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26282001. QC 20171218

Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
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  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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