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Lean in retail – implementation in stores
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix, LiU. (Ergonomics)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5338-0586
2017 (English)In: / [ed] Anna-Lisa Osvalder, Mikael Blomé, Hajnalka Bodnar, Lund, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background and purpose

Lean has been implemented to varying degrees in different organizations and in different branches. Mass-producing manufacturing industries were early in this respect, and later followed by e.g. healthcare, authorities and municipalities. Presently, some stores are implementing Lean-inspired working methods. The purpose of this paper is to identify different ways of working with and implementing Lean in stores.

 

Methods

The methods used were case studies in 9 stores. The stores were visited and data were collected through observation of working methods and artefacts in the stores, interviews were conducted with employees and managers, and a questionnaire was answered by a sample of those working in the stores. Finally, documents were collected and photographs were taken.

 

Results

A few stores worked according to some the principles of Lean, and other stores had implemented some of the Lean tools. Other stores had statements of the values for the organization on display. Continuous improvement and 5S were two commonly used tools. Visualisation by using whiteboards and KPIs were also applied in several stores, and daily meetings between the store manager and the employees were also taking place in a few stores. Waste reduction has been used for a long time in stores handling fresh food, as well as substantial work in order to improve the logistics. These are aspects that Lean include, but were present in the stores before Lean was introduced.

 

Discussion with practical implications

Few examples of a long-term Lean tradition exist. Disseminating good examples that are also good for the work environment of the employees could support a more holistic way of working with Lean and improve working conditions in the future.

 

Conclusions

The use of Lean in stores is under development, and several stores have started to introduce Lean-inspired working methods, such as Continuous improvement, 5S, customer orientation, visualization, daily whiteboard meetings and waste reduction.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund, 2017.
Keywords [en]
Shops, Customer orientation, Work environment, Employees.
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-220795OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-220795DiVA, id: diva2:1171343
Conference
NES2017 Conference
Note

QC 20180109

Available from: 2018-01-07 Created: 2018-01-07 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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