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Active quinine-based films able to release antimicrobial compounds via melt quaternization at low temperature
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9200-8004
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2018 (English)In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 98-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The fabrication of antibacterial films based on renewable materials (e.g., chitosan) has attracted significant interest in fields such as food packaging, health care and medicine. However, exploiting the antibacterial properties of cinchona alkaloids to design active nanostructured films able to release quinine-based antimicrobial compounds has not been considered previously. Herein, we develop two different routes to produce active quinine-based nanostructured cross-linked films by exploiting the multiple reactive sites of quinine and, specifically, both the nitrogen atom and the vinyl group of the quinuclidine portion of the molecule, as well as their corresponding orthogonal quaternization and thiol-ene coupling reactions. The first synthetic strategy produces stiff and brittle nanostructured quinine-based films of limited utility for practical applications. Conversely, the second approach produces active, flexible and nanostructured quinine-based films (T-g = - 14 degrees C, Young's modulus = 1.3 GPa), which are able to release antimicrobial compounds against E. coli that, remarkably, are noncytotoxic against mouse macrophage and human dermal fibroblast cells. These kinds of active cinchona alkaloid-based coatings are easy to prepare by means of simple, solvent-free, melt quaternization/spreading procedures at a relatively low temperature (120 degrees C), making this second approach one of the most facile reported procedures to date to produce active nanostructured bio-based films.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY , 2018. Vol. 6, no 1, p. 98-104
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Polymer Technologies
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URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-220813DOI: 10.1039/c7tb02739gISI: 000418379700009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85038944460OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-220813DiVA, id: diva2:1174715
Note

QC 20180116

Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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Malkoch, Michael

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