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The role of striatal feedforward inhibition in propagation of cortical oscillations
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computational Science and Technology (CST). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Bernstein Center Freiburg, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, 79104, Germany.
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computational Science and Technology (CST). Bernstein Center Freiburg, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, 79104, Germany.
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computational Science and Technology (CST). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Solna, 17177, Sweden.
2017 (English)In: BMC neuroscience (Online), ISSN 1471-2202, E-ISSN 1471-2202, Vol. 18, p. 91-91Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fast spiking interneurons (FSIs) and feedforward (FF) inhibition are a common property of neuronal networks throughout the brain and play crucial role in neural computations. For instance, in the cortex FF inhibition sets the window of temporal integration and spiking and thereby contributes to the control of firing rate and correlations [1]. In the striatum (the main input structure of the basal ganglia) despite their high firing rates and strong synapses, FSIs (comprise 1–2% of striatal neurons) do not seem to play a major role in controlling the firing of medium spiny neurons (MSNs; comprise 95% of striatal neurons) [2] and so far, it has not been possible to attribute a functional role to FSIs in the striatum. Here we use a spiking neuron network model in order to investigate how externally induced oscillations propagate through striatal circuitry. Recordings in the striatum have shown robust oscillatory activity that might be in fact cortical oscillations transmitted by the corticostriatal projections [3–5]. We propose that FSIs can perform an important role in transferring cortical oscillations to the striatum especially to those MSNs that are not directly driven by the cortical oscillations. Strong and divergent connectivity of FSIs implies that even weak oscillations in FSI population activity can be spread to the whole MSN population [6]. Further, we have identified multiple factors that influence the transfer of oscillations to MSNs. The variables such as the number of activated neurons, ongoing activity, connectivity, and synchronicity of inputs influence the transfer of oscillations by modifying the levels of feedforward and feedback inhibitions suggesting that the striatum can exploit different parameters to impact the transfer of oscillatory signals.

References

1. Isaacson, J. S., & Scanziani, M. (2011). How inhibition shapes cortical activity. Neuron, 72(2), 231–243. 

2. Berke, J. D. (2011). Functional properties of striatal fast-spiking interneurons. Frontiers in systems neuroscience, 5.

3. Belić, J. J., Halje, P., Richter, U., Petersson, P., & Kotaleski, J. H. (2016). Untangling cortico-striatal connectivity and cross-frequency coupling in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Frontiers in systems neuroscience, 10.

4. Berke, J. D. (2009). Fast oscillations in cortical‐striatal networks switch frequency following rewarding events and stimulant drugs. European Journal of Neuroscience, 30(5), 848–859.

5. Boraud, T., Brown, P., Goldberg, J. A., Graybiel, A. M., & Magill, P. J. (2005). Oscillations in the basal ganglia: the good, the bad, and the unexpected. In The basal ganglia VIII (pp. 1–24). Springer US.

6. Belić, J. J., Kumar, A., & Kotaleski, J. H. (2017). Interplay between periodic stimulation and GABAergic inhibition in striatal network oscillations. PloS one, 12(4), e0175135.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Antwerpen, 2017. Vol. 18, p. 91-91
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-221424OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-221424DiVA, id: diva2:1174819
Conference
CNS 2017
Note

QC 20180122

Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-22Bibliographically approved

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