Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Market-based low-carbon retrofit in social housing: Insights from Greater Manchester
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0688-9547
2018 (English)In: Journal of Urban Affairs, ISSN 0735-2166, E-ISSN 1467-9906Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, social housing providers in the UK have become influential actors in realizing the national government’s decarborization agenda. However, when decarbonization is considered in light of austerity measures and the privatization of public housing, a number of contradictions arise. From interviews and a workshop with policymakers and registered providers in the city-region of Greater Manchester, three tensions are highlighted. First, since the 1980s, the housing stock condition has been used as a political pawn in successive reforms to demunicipalize social housing. Second, local authorities continue to harness the collectivities that remain in the social housing sector to realize their decarbonization goals. Third, the retrofit practices of social landlords are only superficially aiming for carbon control; instead, they focus on the social aims that are seen as important to the ethos and business model of the landlord. The article concludes that there are unavoidable conflicts between the interests of different actors whose low-carbon economy is conceived at different spatial scales and with different underlying objectives. As social landlords are foregrounded in subregional low-carbon policy, they are effectively co-opted into market-based retrofit, resulting in unintended consequences for the social housing sector.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-225154DOI: 10.1080/07352166.2018.1439340Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85044445594OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-225154DiVA, id: diva2:1194371
Note

QC 20180411

Available from: 2018-04-01 Created: 2018-04-01 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopushttps://doi.org/10.1080/07352166.2018.1439340

Authority records BETA

Karvonen, Andrew

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Karvonen, Andrew
By organisation
Urban and Regional Studies
In the same journal
Journal of Urban Affairs
Social Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 4 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf