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Lie Detection Using fNIRS Monitoring of Inhibition-Related Brain Regions Discriminates Infrequent but not Frequent Liars
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 12, article id 71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to test whether monitoring inhibition-related brain regions is a feasible method for detecting both infrequent liars and frequent liars. Thirty-two participants were divided into two groups: the deceptive group (liars) and the non-deceptive group (ND group, innocents). All the participants were required to undergo a simulated interrogation by a computer. The participants from the deceptive group were instructed to tell a mix of lies and truths and those of the ND group were instructed always to tell the truth. Based on the number of deceptions, the participants of the deceptive group were further divided into a infrequently deceptive group (IFD group, infrequent liars) and a frequently deceptive group (FD group, frequent liars). The infrequent liars exhibited greater neural activities than the frequent liars and the innocents in the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG) when performing the deception detection tasks. While performing deception detection tasks, infrequent liars showed significantly greater neural activation in the left MFG than the baseline, but frequent liars and innocents did not exhibit this pattern of neural activation in any area of inhibition-related brain regions. The results of individual analysis showed an acceptable accuracy of detecting infrequent liars, but an unacceptable accuracy of detecting frequent liars. These results suggest that using fNIRS monitoring of inhibition-related brain regions is feasible for detecting infrequent liars, for whom deception may be more effortful and therefore more physiologically marked, but not frequent liars.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018. Vol. 12, article id 71
Keywords [en]
fNIRS, deception, detection feasibility, inhibition, middle frontal gyrus
National Category
Neurology Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-225187DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2018.00071ISI: 000427303100001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85046885530OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-225187DiVA, id: diva2:1195013
Note

QC 20180404

Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved

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He, Sailing
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