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Can gamma irradiation during radiotherapy influence the metal release process for biomedical CoCrMo and 316L alloys?
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The extent of metal release from implant materials that are irradiated during radiotherapy may be influenced by irradiation-formed radicals. The influence of gamma irradiation, with a total dose of relevance for radiotherapy (e.g., for cancer treatments) on the extent of metal release from biomedical stainless steel AISI 316L and a cobalt-chromium alloy (CoCrMo) was investigated in physiological relevant solutions (phosphate buffered saline with and without 10 g/L bovine serum albumin) at pH 7.3. Directly after irradiation, the released amounts of metals were significantly higher for irradiated CoCrMo as compared to nonirradiated CoCrMo, resulting in an increased surface passivation (enhanced passive conditions) that hindered further release. A similar effect was observed for 316L showing lower nickel release after 1 h of initially irradiated samples as compared to nonirradiated samples. However, the effect of irradiation (total dose of 16.5 Gy) on metal release and surface oxide composition and thickness was generally small. Most metals were released initially (within seconds) upon immersion from CoCrMo but not from 316L. Albumin induced an increased amount of released metals from AISI 316L but not from CoCrMo. Albumin was not found to aggregate to any greater extent either upon gamma irradiation or in the presence of trace metal ions, as determined using different light scattering techniques. Further studies should elucidate the effect of repeated friction and fractionated low irradiation doses on the short- and long term metal release process of biomedical materials. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
Keyword [en]
BSA, implant, passivation, radicals, radiotherapy
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Corrosion Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-225956DOI: 10.1002/jbm.b.34084PubMedID: 29424962OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-225956DiVA, id: diva2:1196877
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015–04177
Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2018-04-11

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Odnevall Wallinder, IngerHedberg, Yolanda

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Odnevall Wallinder, IngerHedberg, Yolanda
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Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials
Occupational Health and Environmental HealthCorrosion Engineering

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