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Beyond the Concept of Anonymity: What is Really at Stake?
Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5830-3432
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-226342OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-226342DiVA, id: diva2:1198533
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency
Note

QC 20180424

Available from: 2018-04-17 Created: 2018-04-17 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Information, Security, Privacy, and Anonymity: Definitional and Conceptual Issues
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information, Security, Privacy, and Anonymity: Definitional and Conceptual Issues
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This doctoral thesis consists of five research papers that address four tangential topics, all of which are relevant for the challenges we are facing in our socio-technical society: information, security, privacy, and anonymity. All topics are approached by similar methods, i.e. with a concern about conceptual and definitional issues. In Paper I—concerning the concept of information and a semantic conception thereof—it is argued that the veridicality thesis (i.e. that information must be true or truthful) is false. In Paper II—concerning information security—it is argued that the current leading definitions suffer from counter-examples, and lack an appropriate conceptual sense. Based on this criticism a new kind of definition is proposed and defended.  In Paper III—concerning control definitions of privacy—it is argued that any sensible control-definition of privacy must properly recognize the context as part of the defining criteria. In Paper IV—concerning the concept of privacy—it is argued that privacy is a normative concept and that it is constituted by our social relations. Final, in Paper V—concerning anonymity—it is argued that the threat from deanonymization technology goes beyond harm to anonymity. It is argued that a person who never is deanonymized can still be harmed and what is at stake is an ability to be anonymous.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2018. p. 70
Series
TRITA-ABE-DLT ; 1811
Keyword
definitions, distinctions, conceptual analysis, philosophy of information, philosophy of risk, security, information, information security, semantics, semantic information, veridicality thesis, informativity, appropriate access, CIA, privacy, control, context, pro tanto good, social relations, anonymity, deanonymization, ability to be anonymous
National Category
Philosophy
Research subject
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-226651 (URN)978-91-7729-759-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-06-04, Kollegiesalen, Brinellvägen 8, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
SECURIT
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, H5300
Note

QC 20180425

Available from: 2018-04-25 Created: 2018-04-24 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved

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