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Comparison of in vivo vs. ex situ obtained material properties of sheep common carotid artery
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5795-9867
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2018 (English)In: Medical Engineering and Physics, ISSN 1350-4533, E-ISSN 1873-4030, Vol. 55, p. 16-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patient-specific biomechanical modelling can improve preoperative surgical planning. This requires patient-specific geometry as well as patient-specific material properties as input. The latter are, however, still quite challenging to estimate in vivo. This study focuses on the estimation of the mechanical properties of the arterial wall. Firstly, in vivo pressure, diameter and thickness of the arterial wall were acquired for sheep common carotid arteries. Next, the animals were sacrificed and the tissue was stored for mechanical testing. Planar biaxial tests were performed to obtain experimental stress-stretch curves. Finally, parameters for the hyperelastic Mooney–Rivlin and Gasser–Ogden–Holzapfel (GOH) material model were estimated based on the in vivo obtained pressure-diameter data as well as on the ex situ experimental stress-stretch curves. Both material models were able to capture the in vivo behaviour of the tissue. However, in the ex situ case only the GOH model provided satisfactory results. When comparing different fitting approaches, in vivo vs. ex situ, each of them showed its own advantages and disadvantages. The in vivo approach estimates the properties of the tissue in its physiological state while the ex situ approach allows to apply different loadings to properly capture the anisotropy of the tissue. Both of them could be further enhanced by improving the estimation of the stress-free state, i.e. by adding residual circumferential stresses in vivo and by accounting for the flattening effect of the tested samples ex vivo.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 55, p. 16-24
Keyword [en]
Common carotid artery, Constitutive modelling, Material properties, Parameter estimation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-227579DOI: 10.1016/j.medengphy.2018.03.006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85044339134OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-227579DiVA, id: diva2:1206139
Note

QC 20180516

Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-16 Last updated: 2018-05-16Bibliographically approved

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Larsson, Matilda

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