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Confocal super-resolution imaging of the glomerular filtration barrier enabled by tissue expansion
KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Royal Inst Technol, Dept Appl Phys, Sci Life Lab, Solna, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Sci Life Lab, Solna, Sweden..
Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, KI AZ Integrated CardioMetab Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, KI AZ Integrated CardioMetab Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
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2018 (English)In: Kidney International, ISSN 0085-2538, E-ISSN 1523-1755, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 1008-1013Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The glomerular filtration barrier, has historically only been spatially resolved using electron microscopy due to the nanometer-scale dimensions of these structures. Recently, it was shown that the nanoscale distribution of proteins in the slit diaphragm can be resolved by fluorescence based stimulated emission depletion microscopy, in combination with optical clearing. Fluorescence microscopy has advantages over electron microscopy in terms of multiplex imaging of different epitopes, and also the amount of volumetric data that can be extracted from thicker samples. However, stimulated emission depletion microscopy is still a costly technique commonly not available to most life science researchers. An imaging technique with which the glomerular filtration barrier can be visualized using more standard fluorescence imaging techniques is thus desirable. Recent studies have shown that biological tissue samples can be isotropically expanded, revealing nanoscale localizations of multiple epitopes using confocal microscopy. Here we show that kidney samples can be expanded sufficiently to study the finest elements of the filtration barrier using confocal microscopy. Thus, our result opens up the possibility to study protein distributions and foot process morphology on the effective nanometer-scale.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC , 2018. Vol. 93, no 4, p. 1008-1013
Keywords [en]
glomerulus, imaging, podocyte, renal pathology
National Category
Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-226201DOI: 10.1016/j.kint.2017.09.019ISI: 000428169200029PubMedID: 29241621Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85037568536OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-226201DiVA, id: diva2:1207896
Note

QC 20180518

Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved

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Jess, David UnnersjöBlom, HansBrismar, Hjalmar

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