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Hypoxia worsens affective responses and feeling of fatigue during prolonged bed rest
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Environmental Physiology.
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, no MAR, article id 362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research, although limited, suggests that both hypoxia and bed rest influence psychological responses by exaggerating negative psychological responses and attenuating positive emotions. The present study investigated the effect of a 21-day prolonged exposure to normobaric hypoxia and bed rest on affective responses and fatigue. Eleven healthy participants underwent three 21-day interventions using a cross-over design: (1) normobaric hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAMB), (2) normobaric hypoxic bed rest (HBR) and (3) normoxic bed rest (NBR). Affective and fatigue responses were investigated using the Activation Deactivation Adjective Check List, and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, which were completed before (Pre), during (Day 7, Day 14, and Day 21) and after (Post) the interventions. The most negative psychological profile appeared during the HBR intervention. Specifically, tiredness, tension, general and physical fatigue significantly increased on days 7, 14, and 21, as well as at Post. After the HBR intervention, general and physical fatigue remained higher compared to Pre values. Additionally, a deterioration of psychological responses was also noted following HAMB and NBR. In particular, both hypoxia and BR per se induced subjective fatigue and negative affective responses. BR seems to exert a moderate negative effect on the sensation of fatigue, whereas exercise attenuates the negative effects of hypoxia as noted during the HAMB condition. In conclusion, our data suggest that the addition of hypoxia to bed rest-induced inactivity significantly worsens affective responses and feeling of fatigue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A. , 2018. Vol. 9, no MAR, article id 362
Keywords [en]
Affect, Bed rest, Fatigue, Hypoxia, Inactivity, Motivation
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-227383DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00362ISI: 000428201100001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85044381679OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-227383DiVA, id: diva2:1211162
Note

Export Date: 9 May 2018; Article; Correspondence Address: Mekjavic, I.B.; Department for Automation, Biocybernetics and Robotics, Jozef Stefan InstituteSlovenia; email: igor.mekjavic@ijs.si. QC 20180530

Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-05-30Bibliographically approved

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