Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Balancing curriculum intent with expected student responses to designerly tasks
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8292-5642
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4199-4753
2018 (English)In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 26-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Design activities form an extensive part of design and technology education with a link being posited within the pertinent literature between the cognitive activity of learning and the cognitive activity of design. It is therefore critical that design educators’ understand the effects that design constraints can have on the learning process. This paper aims to examine the potential to affect student responses and associated learning from design tasks based on the manipulation of task variables. A study was designed to examine the effects of two modelling systems – one parametric and one non-parametric – on the thought processes and design journeys of the students. The findings suggest that the use of parametric modelling can emphasis student thinking on technical considerations while the use of a freeform moulding CAD system affords a more creative orientation. Qualitative findings demonstrate the capacity of students to select appropriate strategies to complete the design task, further indicating that relaxing design constraints can support student learning in design activities. Considering curricular intentions to develop both technical and creative competencies, this study presents empirical findings illustrating how teachers can strategically design tasks which balance expected student responses with intended learning outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 23, no 1, p. 26-39
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-231988OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-231988DiVA, id: diva2:1231419
Note

QC 20180717

Available from: 2018-07-06 Created: 2018-07-06 Last updated: 2018-07-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(831 kB)4 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 831 kBChecksum SHA-512
d5dbf36557d791f09fe6112b5c0291639d6d4ffa881c838805f4ad3c6957b54c7b4bbd7923ba59c3d2f00b634bfd266bfa301e41eba4b664179f1c61acb0357b
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/DATE/article/view/2302

Authority records BETA

Buckley, JeffreySeery, Niall

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Buckley, JeffreySeery, Niall
By organisation
School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM)
In the same journal
Design and Technology Education: An International Journal
Educational Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 4 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 7 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf