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Extracellular nanovesicles released from the commensal yeast Malassezia sympodialis are enriched in allergens and interact with cells in human skin
Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Dept Oncol Pathol, S-17121 Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Sodersjukhuset, SE-11883 Stockholm, Sweden.;Soder Sjukhuset, Unit Sachs Children & Youth Hosp, SE-11883 Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Translat Immunol Unit, Dept Med Solna, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Hosp, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Translat Immunol Unit, Dept Med Solna, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Hosp, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 9182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Malassezia sympodialis is a dominant commensal fungi in the human skin mycobiome but is also associated with common skin disorders including atopic eczema (AE). M. sympodialis releases extracellular vesicles, designated MalaEx, which are carriers of small RNAs and allergens, and they can induce inflammatory cytokine responses. Here we explored how MalaEx are involved in hostmicrobe interactions by comparing protein content of MalaEx with that of the parental yeast cells, and by investigating interactions of MalaEx with cells in the skin. Cryo-electron tomography revealed a heterogeneous population of MalaEx. iTRAQ based quantitative proteomics identified in total 2439 proteins in all replicates of which 110 were enriched in MalaEx compared to the yeast cells. Among the MalaEx enriched proteins were two of the M. sympodialis allergens, Mala s 1 and s 7. Functional experiments indicated an active binding and internalization of MalaEx into human keratinocytes and monocytes, and MalaEx were found in close proximity of the nuclei using super-resolution fluorescence 3D-SIM imaging. Our results provides new insights into host-microbe interactions, supporting that MalaEx may have a role in the sensitization and maintenance of inflammation in AE by containing enriched amounts of allergens and with their ability to interact with skin cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP , 2018. Vol. 8, article id 9182
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Immunology in the medical area
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URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-231701DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-27451-9ISI: 000435338900022PubMedID: 29907748Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85048721050OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-231701DiVA, id: diva2:1241608
Note

Correction in DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-43724-3 ISI: 000490123400003QC 20200329

Available from: 2018-08-24 Created: 2018-08-24 Last updated: 2020-03-29Bibliographically approved

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