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Severe Periodontitis Is Associated with Myocardial Infarction in Females
Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Capio St Gorans Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7606-8771
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 97, no 10, p. 1114-1121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that there is a sex difference in the association between periodontitis (PD) and a first myocardial infarction (MI). The analysis in the case-control study was based on 785 patients (147 females and 638 males) with a first MI and 792 matched controls (147 females and 645 males), screened for cardiovascular risk factors and subjected to a panoramic dental X-ray. Periodontal status was defined by alveolar bone loss and diagnosed as no PD (>= 80% remaining alveolar bone), mild to moderate PD (66% to 79%), or severe PD (<66%). Logistic regression was used when analyzing PD as a risk factor for MI, adjusting for age, smoking, diabetes, education, and marital status. The mean age was 64 +/- 7 y for females and 62 +/- 8 y for males. Severe PD was more common in female patients than female controls (14 vs. 4%, P = 0.005), with an increased risk for severe PD among female patients with a first MI (odds ratio [OR] = 3.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.53 to 10.00, P = 0.005), which remained (OR = 3.72, 95% CI = 1.24 to 11.16, P = 0.005) after adjustments. Male patients had more severe PD (7% vs. 4%; P = 0.005) than male controls and an increased risk for severe PD (OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.14 to 3.11, P = 0.005), but this association did not remain following adjustment (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 0.97 to 2.84, NS). Severe PD was associated with MI in both females and males. After adjustments for relevant confounders, this association did, however, remain only in females. These data underline the importance of considering poor dental health when evaluating cardiovascular risk, especially in females.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC , 2018. Vol. 97, no 10, p. 1114-1121
Keywords [en]
cardiovascular disease, inflammation, risk factors, atherosclerosis, gender difference, epidemiology
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
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URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-234160DOI: 10.1177/0022034518765735ISI: 000442273700007PubMedID: 29596754Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85045069984OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-234160DiVA, id: diva2:1257640
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QC 20181022

Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved

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