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An introduction to epitope mapping
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6104-6446
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9977-5724
2018 (English)In: Methods in Molecular Biology, ISSN 1064-3745, E-ISSN 1940-6029, Vol. 1785, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Antibodies are protein molecules used routinely for therapeutic, diagnostic, and research purposes due to their exquisite ability to selectively recognize and bind a given antigen. The particular area of the antigen recognized by the antibody is called the epitope, and for proteinaceous antigens the epitope can be of complex nature. Information about the binding epitope of an antibody can provide important mechanistic insights and indicate for what applications an antibody might be useful. Therefore, a variety of epitope mapping techniques have been developed to localize such regions. Although the real picture is even more complex, epitopes in protein antigens are broadly grouped into linear or discontinuous epitopes depending on the positioning of the epitope residues in the antigen sequence and the requirement of structure. Specialized methods for mapping of the two different classes of epitopes, using high-throughput or high-resolution methods, have been developed. While different in their detail, all of the experimental methods rely on assessing the binding of the antibody to the antigen or a set of antigen mimics. Early approaches utilizing sets of truncated proteins, small numbers of synthesized peptides, and structural analyses of antibody-antigen complexes have been significantly refined. Current state-of-the-art methods involve combinations of mutational scanning, protein display, and high-throughput screening in conjunction with bioinformatic analyses of large datasets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Humana Press, 2018. Vol. 1785, p. 1-10
Keywords [en]
Antibody, Antigen, Epitope, Epitope mapping, Mutagenesis, Peptide, Prediction, Structural biology, antigen antibody complex, antigen structure, computer model, high throughput screening, human
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236418DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-7841-0_1PubMedID: 29714008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85046367049OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-236418DiVA, id: diva2:1259004
Funder
VINNOVAKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20181026

Available from: 2018-10-26 Created: 2018-10-26 Last updated: 2020-03-09Bibliographically approved

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Nilvebrant, JohanRockberg, Johan

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