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Screening of sugar alcohols and their binary eutectic mixtures as phase change materials for low-to-medium temperature latent heat storage. (Ⅰ): Non-isothermal melting and crystallization behaviors
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2018 (English)In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 160, p. 1078-1090Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Towards latent heat storage in the low-to-medium temperature range (70–250 °C), screening of sugar alcohols and their binary eutectic mixtures as potential phase change materials was carried out by focusing on the non-isothermal melting and crystallization behaviors. A preliminary screening shortened the long list of isomers from common four-carbon to six-carbon sugar alcohols to only six affordable candidates, i.e., xylitol, d-sorbitol, erythritol, d-mannitol, d-dulcitol and inositol (ordered with increasing the melting point). Based on the six pre-screened sugar alcohols, a total of 15 binary eutectic mixtures were prepared to manipulate the melting points for more flexible match with real applications. Non-isothermal tests were then performed on a differential scanning calorimeter at various ramping/cooling rates up to 10 °C/min. In addition to determination of the melting point and latent heat of fusion, a special attention was paid to the crystallization behaviors by undertaking consecutive melting-crystallization cyclic tests. It was found that the two candidates with the lowest melting points (both below 100 °C), i.e., xylitol and d-sorbitol, as well as the nine binary eutectic mixtures containing at least one of them, are unable to crystallize from the melt during cool-down at any cooling rates tested (down to 0.5 °C/min). Four other binary eutectic mixtures, i.e., erythritol (84 mol%) + d-mannitol, erythritol (95 mol%) + d-dulcitol, erythritol (96 mol%) + inositol and d-dulcitol (69 mol%) + inositol, were also shown to be unable to crystallize upon cooling, with the crystallization occurring during the reheating process instead, referred to as cold crystallization. The rest four pure sugar alcohols with relatively high melting points (110–230 °C), i.e., erythritol, d-mannitol, d-dulcitol, inositol, and two mixtures, i.e., d-mannitol (70 mol%) + d-dulcitol and d-mannitol (82 mol%) +inositol, were found to be able to crystallize upon cooling, although they all suffer from severe supercooling (e.g., up to over 100 °C for erythritol). The affordable pure and mixture sugar alcohols were deemed to have desirably high latent heat storage density, especially for those with higher melting points. However, they all face specific issues associated with crystallization, which must be addressed before they can really be utilized in real applications. In addition, it may not worth making eutectic mixtures, although this is deemed to be an effective way of manipulating the melting points of sugar alcohols. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2018. Vol. 160, p. 1078-1090
Keywords [en]
Binary eutectic mixture, Latent heat storage, Non-isothermal melting and crystallization, Phase change material, Sugar alcohol, Supercooling, Alcohols, Binary mixtures, Carbon, Crystallization, Differential scanning calorimetry, Drug products, Eutectics, Heat storage, Isomers, Isotherms, Latent heat, Melting point, Polyols, Storage (materials), Sugar substitutes, Sugars, Binary eutectics, Cold crystallization, Crystallization behavior, Differential scanning calorimeters, Higher melting points, Latent heat of fusion, Nonisothermal, Sugar alcohols, Phase change materials, alcohol, cooling, heat balance, isotherm, low temperature, sugar, temperature effect, testing method
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236660DOI: 10.1016/j.energy.2018.07.081ISI: 000445985300089Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85053078424OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-236660DiVA, id: diva2:1262803
Note

Export Date: 22 October 2018; Article; CODEN: ENEYD; Correspondence Address: Fan, L.-W.; Institute of Thermal Science and Power Systems, School of Energy Engineering, Zhejiang UniversityChina; email: liwufan@zju.edu.cn; Funding details: ZJU, Zhejiang University; Funding details: LR17E060001, Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province; Funding text: This material is based upon work supported by the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. LR17E060001 . L.-W. Fan would like to thank a start-up fund granted by the “100 Talents Program” of Zhejiang University. QC 20181113

Available from: 2018-11-13 Created: 2018-11-13 Last updated: 2018-11-13Bibliographically approved

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