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Household responsiveness to residential demand response strategies - Results and policy implications from a Swedish field study
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Finnish Environm Inst SYKE, Environm Policy Ctr, PL 140, Helsinki 00251, Finland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9869-9707
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7020-1551
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2018 (English)In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To realize the benefits of smart grids, residential demand response (DR) aims to increase demand flexibility by influence household electricity consumption. Although price-based DR programs have shown potential, there is a need to further investigate the effectiveness of DR in energy strategy and policy development. The evaluation of DR has focused on the impact on overall power demand, assuming that consumers are economically rational decision-maker. However, recent findings suggest that consumer responses have been insufficient and calls have been made to identify novel evaluation approaches that better reflect the human dimension of energy consumption. Continuing this line of enquiry, this paper aims to investigate the effectiveness of DR and explore the potential of environmental incentives for increased consumer engagement. We propose an interdisciplinary evaluation framework to understand variations in household responsiveness to DR strategies, which is tested in a Swedish DR field trial covering 136 households during 2017. Results suggest that the effectiveness of DR varies widely across household type; ranging from substantial reductions in overall consumption and during peak periods, to increases in consumption during peak periods. Furthermore, a clear favor of price incentives, compared to environmental incentives, as the most efficient strategy to increase demand flexibility was observed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018.
National Category
Energy Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239302DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2018.07.044ISI: 000447576700026Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85050794561OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-239302DiVA, id: diva2:1264275
Note

QC 20181120

Available from: 2018-11-19 Created: 2018-11-19 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Energy Feedback and Demand Response Strategies: Exploring Household Engagement and Response Using a Mixed Methods Approach
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy Feedback and Demand Response Strategies: Exploring Household Engagement and Response Using a Mixed Methods Approach
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Real-time energy feedback (EF) and demand response using dynamic pricing tariffs (DR) have been suggested as effective intervention strategies to meet the need for increased energy efficiency and demand flexibility in the residential sector. Although previous studies provide some empirical support for the effectiveness of EF and DR, evaluation approaches used in practical experiments and field trials commonly suffer from several methodological shortcomings, preventing deeper of knowledge on the potential and barriers for EF and DR to influence household energy consumption.

This thesis explored the potential of employing a mixed methods approach for evaluation of household energy consumption to provide improved understanding on how and why households engage and respond to EF and DR strategies. Three research objectives were set: 1) Analysis of the potential for using high-resolution data from smart meters in evaluation of household energy consumption and response to DR strategies, 2) development of a conceptual framework for evaluation of household responses to EF and DR strategies and analysis of its potential to increase understanding of household responsiveness, and 3) identification and analysis of household motivations, perceptions, and obstacles to engaging in EF and DR strategies.

The work to achieve these objectives followed a mixed methods research methodology grounded on literature reviews and empirical studies in real-life settings in a single case study, an EF/DR field trial taking place in Stockholm Royal Seaport. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used for data collection and analysis, comprising interviews, surveys, and statistical analysis of smart meter energy data.

The results suggest that the mixed methods approach addresses several of the limitations and challenges associated with previous evaluation approaches. As regards objective (1), it was found that high-resolution data from smart energy meters can provide evaluation outcomes with increased transparency and accuracy. Regarding objective (2), it was found that the proposed framework can increase understanding of variations in household responsiveness to EF and DR strategies and reveal the relationship between impacts on electricity use and factors influencing energy consumption behavior. As regards objective (3), several obstacles for households to engaging in EF and DR strategies were identified, primarily related to household-individual factors such as knowledge, sense of control, and personal values and attitudes. Based on these findings, key issues and areas for further research are proposed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2018. p. 51
Series
TRITA-ABE-DLT ; 1825
Keywords
Energy feedback; demand response; household energy consumption; energy efficiency and conservation, demand flexibility; smart grids; smart homes
National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Industrial Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239303 (URN)978-91-7729-984-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-12-12, F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20181120

Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-19 Last updated: 2018-11-20Bibliographically approved

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Lazarevic, DavidBrandt, NilsKordas, Olga

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