Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Historical Sites and Heritage in the Polar Regions
Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6461-7734
2018 (English)In: The Routledge Handbook of the Polar Regions / [ed] Mark Nuttall, Torben Røjle Christensen and Martin Siegert, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 116-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Polar Regions of today are marked by the imprints from thousands of years of human activities, from the first peoples who settled there in the distant past to those who arrived more recently – e.g. explorers, industrialists, militaries, scientists. This chapter gives an overview of the material historical remains of past human activities in the Arctic and Antarctic and explains under which circumstances they have been recognized as cultural heritage sites, i.e. remains which different actors for various reasons have defined, protected and managed as such. The chapter is divided into two main sections, the first presenting an overview of the archaeological record in the Arctic from 20 000 BCE until the 20th century, and in the Antarctic (including the Sub-Antarctic) from the 18th century until present days. The second section discusses how stakeholders in the Polar Regions have dealt with these archaeological sites. Under which circumstances do historical remains in the Polar Regions become heritage and why?

The chapter shows that there is a wide variety of actors who work to protect historical remains as heritage and for different reasons – e.g. archaeologists and historians using them as sources for explaining historical change, state authorities for diversifying local economies and supporting local identity and tourism companies using them for creating new destinations. Thus the material legacies of the past in the polar areas should not only be understood as environmental problems but also as a potential resource for building sustainable futures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018. p. 116-133
Keywords [en]
Cultural heritage, Heritagization, Arctic, Antarctic, History
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239895OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-239895DiVA, id: diva2:1268100
Projects
Mining heritage as a resource for sustainable communities
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSwedish Research Council
Note

QC 20181205

Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Avango, Dag

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Avango, Dag
By organisation
History of Science, Technology and Environment
History and Archaeology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 45 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf