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High-Yield Passive Plasma Filtration from Human Finger Prick Blood
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Micro and Nanosystems.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3601-0342
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Micro and Nanosystems.
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Micro and Nanosystems.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8531-5607
Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
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2018 (English)In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 90, no 22, p. 13393-13399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whole-blood microsampling provides many benefits such as remote, patient-centric, and minimally invasive sampling. However, blood plasma, and not whole blood, is the prevailing matrix in clinical laboratory investigations. The challenge with plasma microsampling is to extract plasma volumes large enough to reliably detect low-concentration analytes from a small finger prick sample. Here we introduce a passive plasma filtration device that provides a high extraction yield of 65%, filtering 18 mu L of plasma from 50 mu L of undiluted human whole blood (hematocrit 45%) within less than 10 min. The enabling design element is a wedge-shaped connection between the blood filter and the hydrophilic bottom surface of a capillary channel. Using finger prick and venous blood samples from more than 10 healthy volunteers, we examined the filtration kinetics of the device over a hematocrit range of 35-55% and showed that 73 +/- 8% of the total protein content was successfully recovered after filtration. The presented plasma filtration device tackles a major challenge toward patient-centric blood microsampling by providing high-yield plasma filtration, potentially allowing reliable detection of low-concentration analytes from a blood microsample.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC , 2018. Vol. 90, no 22, p. 13393-13399
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Chemical Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239997DOI: 10.1021/acs.analchem.8b03175ISI: 000451246100037PubMedID: 30379058Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85056544539OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-239997DiVA, id: diva2:1269615
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QC 20181211

Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Lenk, GabrielStemme, GöranRoxhed, Niclas

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