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The Making of a National Heritage in Sweden
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, History and Theory of Architecture.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9640-6499
2014 (English)In: Skyddat enligt lag: Vad ska staten äga? / [ed] Anders Bergström, Stockholm: Samverkansforum för statliga byggherrar och förvaltare , 2014, p. 25-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Built heritage in Sweden usually presents itself in a convincingly genuine manner, whether in a book or in real life. This impression is however the result of conscious efforts made in the last hundred years or so. The early twentieth century was a period preoccupied with issues of heritage and national identity, not least within the field of architecture. Academic scholars, museum curators, architects and antiquarians contributed in a dedicated manner to the formation of a Swedish architectural canon. This process involved a variety of professional practices; historical research and publication, extensive investigations and inventories, exhibitions at the cultural history museums, restoration projects and other interventions in the built fabric.

The main concern in this formative period was the architecture of the pre-industrial era. General concepts of Western architectural history, its epochs and styles, were gradually adapted to Swedish conditions, and the emerging national heritage included domestic highlights such as the medieval churches, the Vasa castles, the aristocratic palaces of the seventeenth century and the eighteenth-century manors. This particular image of Swedish heritage has been surprisingly persistent, and to a large degree it still dominates. However, it was not only the most prestigious examples that counted; cultural historians put focus on the vernacular traditions, and the museums presented full-scale representations of a wide range of built environments.

Further on in the twentieth century, attention was moved to more recent epochs – the architecture of the late nineteenth century, the early modernism of the 20s and 30s, and eventually the structuralism of the post-war era – but the ancient monuments still seem to play a key role in the national heritage. Although today’s historical research and heritage discourse generally focus on the twentieth century, modern architecture is rarely included in the national heritage. And as it turns out, not even some of the most outstanding examples of built environments of the twentieth century are protected from alteration or demolition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Samverkansforum för statliga byggherrar och förvaltare , 2014. p. 25-26
Keywords [en]
Sweden, national heritage, architectural heritage
National Category
Architecture
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240121ISBN: 978-91-637-7218-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-240121DiVA, id: diva2:1270050
Note

QC 20181217

Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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