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The effect of urbanization on the functional and scale-sensitive diversity of bird assemblages in Central India
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1955-4647
Bombay Nat Hist Soc, Hornbill House,Shaheed Bhagat Singh Rd, Bombay 400001, Maharashtra, India..
Aarhus Univ, Dept Agroecol, Flakkebjerg Res Ctr, Forsogsvej 1, DK-4200 Slagelse, Denmark..
ICPO Biologists Nat Conservat, 24 Line VO 3-7, St Petersburg 199106, Russia..
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Tropical Ecology, ISSN 0266-4674, E-ISSN 1469-7831, Vol. 34, p. 341-350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Diversity changes can be evaluated at various spatial scales, and the relationship between changes in diversity at the local, landscape and regional scales is not evident. The overall patterns of functional and beta diversity of bird assemblages were evaluated along a five-stage urbanization gradient, censused over the months of January to April in the years 2010-2013, in and around Amravati city, Deccan Plateau, Central India. We expected the abundance of large and predatory species to decline along the gradient, and urbanization to homogenize species richness at the landscape level. Overall, 112,829 birds belonging to 89 species were identified in the region, and species richness decreased from the rural forest (73 species) to more urbanized areas (lowest at the centre of Amravaty city with 29 species). Along the urbanization gradient, bird assemblages contained more small species, and the share of frugivorous and omnivorous species also increased, while that of insectivorous species decreased. Diversity partitioning indicated that of the overall pattern, local (alpha) diversity accounted for 50.1% of the total (gamma) diversity, and urbanization stages another 36.2%; the contribution of within-stage, local diversity was rather small (2.7%), indicating fairly homogeneous assemblages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018. Vol. 34, p. 341-350
Keywords [en]
anthropogenic activities, Ayes, biotic homogenization, disturbance, forest-urban gradient, frugivory, Indian Peninsula, omnivory, scale-sensitive diversity, size effects
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239789DOI: 10.1017/S0266467418000317ISI: 000450726900001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85054991708OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-239789DiVA, id: diva2:1276599
Note

QC 20190108

Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-18Bibliographically approved

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Kale, Manoj AshokraoBhattacharya, Prosun

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