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Mechanical performance of polymer powder bed fused objects - FEM simulation and verification
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Solid Mechanics (Div.).
RISE Bioecon, Drottning Kristinas Vag 61, S-11428 Stockholm, Sweden..
RISE Bioecon, Drottning Kristinas Vag 61, S-11428 Stockholm, Sweden..
RISE Bioecon, Drottning Kristinas Vag 61, S-11428 Stockholm, Sweden..
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2018 (English)In: ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING, ISSN 2214-8604, Vol. 24, p. 577-586Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Additive manufacturing (3D printing) enables the designing and producing of complex geometries in a layer-by layer approach. The layered structure leads to anisotropic behaviour in the material. To accommodate anisotropic behaviour, geometrical optimization is needed so that the 3D printed object meets the pre-set strength and quality requirements. In this article a material description for polymer powder bed fused also or selective laser sintered (SLS) PA12 (Nylon-12), which is a common 3D printing plastic, was investigated, using the Finite Element Method (FEM). The Material Model parameters were obtained by matching them to the test results of multipurpose test specimens (dumb-bells or dog bones) and the model was then used to simulate/predict the mechanical performance of the SLS printed lower-leg prosthesis components, pylon and support. For verification purposes, two FEM designs for a support were SLS printed together with additional test specimens in order to validate the used Material Model. The SLS printed prosthesis pieces were tested according to ISO 10328 Standard. The FEM simulations, together with the Material Model, was found to give good estimations for the location of a failure and its load. It was also noted that there were significant variations among individual SLS printed test specimens, which impacted on the material parameters and the FEM simulations. Hence, to enable reliable FEM simulations for the designing of 3D printed products, better control of the SLS process with regards to porosity, pore morphology and pore distribution is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2018. Vol. 24, p. 577-586
Keywords [en]
Additive manufacturing (3D printing), Selective laser sintering, Finite element method, Material model
National Category
Applied Mechanics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-242261DOI: 10.1016/j.addma.2018.10.009ISI: 000455068500061Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85056189717OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-242261DiVA, id: diva2:1284898
Note

QC 20190201

Available from: 2019-02-01 Created: 2019-02-01 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved

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