Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Telelife: An Immersive Media Experience for Rehabilitation
Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, Umea, Sweden..
Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, Umea, Sweden..
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3779-5647
2014 (English)In: 2014 ASIA-PACIFIC SIGNAL AND INFORMATION PROCESSING ASSOCIATION ANNUAL SUMMIT AND CONFERENCE (APSIPA), IEEE , 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In recent years, emergence of telerehabilitation systems for home-based therapy has altered healthcare systems. Telerehabilitation enables therapists to observe patients status via Internet, thus a patient does not have to visit rehabilitation facilities for every rehabilitation session. Despite the fact that telerehabilitation provides great opportunities, there are two major issues that affect effectiveness of telerehabilitation: relegation of the patient at home, and loss of direct supervision of the therapist. Since patients have no actual interaction with other persons during the rehabilitation period, they will become isolated and gradually lose their social skills. Moreover, without direct supervision of therapists, rehabilitation exercises can be performed with bad compensation strategies that lead to a poor quality recovery. To resolve these issues, we propose telelife, a new concept for future rehabilitation systems. The idea is to use media technology to create a totally new immersive media experience for rehabilitation. In telerehabilitation patients locally execute exercises, and therapists remotely monitor patients' status. In telelife patients, however, remotely perform exercises and therapists locally monitor. Thus, not only telelife enables rehabilitation at distance, but also improves the patients' social competences, and provides direct supervision of therapists. In this paper we introduce telelife to enhance telerehabilitation, and investigate technical challenges and possible methods to achieve telelife.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE , 2014.
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-243773ISI: 000392861900163OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-243773DiVA, id: diva2:1287686
Conference
2014 ASIA-PACIFIC SIGNAL AND INFORMATION PROCESSING ASSOCIATION ANNUAL SUMMIT AND CONFERENCE (APSIPA)
Note

QC 20190211

Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Li, Haibo

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Li, Haibo
By organisation
Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 29 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf