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United States and the making of an Arctic nation
Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8939-6798
2018 (English)In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 95-107, article id https://doi.org/10.1017/S0032247418000219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ABSTRACT. The United States has sometimes been called a reluctant Arctic actor, but during its chairmanship ofthe Arctic Council (2015–2017) the US engaged as an active proponent of Arctic cooperation, using the region as ashowcase for strong global climate policy. This paper placesUSArctic policy development during the Obama presidencywithin a longer time perspective, with a focus on how US interests towards the region have been formulated in policiesand policy statements. The paper uses frame analysis to identify overarching discourses and discusses the extent towhich certain themes and political logics recur or shift over time. It highlights economic development and nationalcompetitiveness as a prominent recurring frame, but also that the policy discourse has moved from nation-building andmilitary security towards a broader security perspective, with attention to energy supply for the US, and more recentlyalso to the implications of climate change. Over time, there is a clear shift from reluctance towards Arctic regionalcooperation to embracing it. Moreover, it highlights how different stands in relation to climate change have affectedArctic cooperation in the past and may do so again in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018. Vol. 54, no 2, p. 95-107, article id https://doi.org/10.1017/S0032247418000219
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-246058DOI: 10.1017/S0032247418000219ISI: 000440667400001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85051109841OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-246058DiVA, id: diva2:1295601
Note

QC 20190318

Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-03-18Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
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  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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