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Modeling Microstructure Evolution in a Martensitic Stainless Steel Subjected to Hot Working Using a Physically Based Model
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering. epartment of Material Science, Dalarna University, Falun, 79188, Sweden.
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4521-6089
2019 (English)In: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. A, ISSN 1073-5623, E-ISSN 1543-1940, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 1480-1488Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The microstructure evolution of a martensitic Stainless steel subjected to hot compression is simulated with a physically based model. The model is based on coupled sets of evolution equations for dislocations, vacancies, recrystallization, and grain growth. The advantage of this model is that with only a few experiments, the material-dependent parameters of the model can be calibrated and used for a new alloy in any deformation condition. The experimental data of this work are obtained from a series of hot compression, and subsequent stress relaxation tests performed in a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator. These tests are carried out at various temperatures ranging from 900 to 1200 °C, strains up to 0.7, and strain rates of 0.01, 1, and 10 s −1 . The grain growth, flow stress, and stress relaxations are simulated by finding reasonable values for model parameters. The flow stress data obtained at the strain rate of 10 s −1 were used to calibrate the model parameters and the predictions of the model for the lower strain rates were quite satisfactory. An assumption in the model is that the structure of second phase particles does not change during the short time of deformation. The results show a satisfactory agreement between the experimental data and simulated flow stress, as well as less than 5 pct difference for grain growth simulations and predicting the dominant softening mechanisms during stress relaxation according to the strain rates and temperatures under deformation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. Vol. 50, no 3, p. 1480-1488
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-246478DOI: 10.1007/s11661-018-5073-6ISI: 000457551800036Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85058849719OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-246478DiVA, id: diva2:1297259
Note

QC 20190319

Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Ågren, John

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