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Speech technology and cinema: Can they learn from each other?
Department of Theatre, Film and Television, University of York, York, United Kingdom.
2013 (English)In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The voice is the most important sound of a film soundtrack. It represents a character and it carries language. There are different types of cinematic voices: dialogue, internal monologues, and voice-overs. Conventionally, two main characteristics differentiate these voices: lip synchronization and the voice's attributes that make it appropriate for the character (for example, a voice that sounds very close to the audience can be appropriate for a narrator, but not for an onscreen character). What happens, then, if a film character can only speak through an asynchronous machine that produces a 'robot-like' voice? This article discusses the sound-related work and experimentation done by the author for the short film Voice by Choice. It also attempts to discover whether speech technology design can learn from its cinematic representation, and if such uncommon film protagonists can contribute creatively to transform the conventions of cinematic voices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2013. Vol. 38, no 3, p. 143-150
Keywords [en]
AAC; cinema; speech technology; synthesized voice; VOCA
National Category
Media Engineering Studies on Film
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-249413DOI: 10.3109/14015439.2013.814708ISI: 000325007700007PubMedID: 23870066Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84885009022OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-249413DiVA, id: diva2:1313794
Note

QC 20190614

Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved

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