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Sonic characteristics of robots in films
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4422-5223
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3086-0322
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 16th Sound and Music Computing Conference, Malaga, Spain, 2019, p. 1-6, article id P2.7Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Robots are increasingly becoming an integral part of our everyday life. Expectations on robots could be influenced by how robots are represented in science fiction films. We hypothesize that sonic interaction design for real-world robots may find inspiration from sound design of fictional robots. In this paper, we present an exploratory study focusing on sonic characteristics of robot sounds in films. We believe that findings from the current study could be of relevance for future robotic applications involving the communication of internal states through sounds, as well for sonification of expressive robot movements. Excerpts from five films were annotated and analysed using Long Time Average Spectrum (LTAS). As an overall observation, we found that robot sonic presence is highly related to the physical appearance of robots. Preliminary results show that most of the robots analysed in this study have “metallic” voice qualities, matching the material of their physical form. Characteristics of robot voices show significant differences compared to voices of human characters; fundamental frequency of robotic voices is either shifted to higher or lower values, and the voices span over a broader frequency band.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malaga, Spain, 2019. p. 1-6, article id P2.7
Keywords [en]
robot sound, non-verbal communication, sonic interaction design, human-robot interaction, film sound design, LTAS
National Category
Media and Communication Technology Human Computer Interaction Media Engineering Interaction Technologies Music Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction; Art, Technology and Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-250788OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-250788DiVA, id: diva2:1313870
Conference
Sound and Music Computing Conference
Projects
SONAO
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-03979NordForsk, 86892
Note

QC 20190625

Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • vancouver
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Output format
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