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The distant gardener: Remote sensing of the planetary potager
Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3221-5818
Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8532-0876
2019 (English)In: Gardens and Human Agency in the Anthropocene / [ed] Maria Paula Diogo, Ana Simoes, Ana Duarte Rodrigues, and Davide Scarso, London and New York: Routledge, 2019, 1, p. 124-142Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The power of the distant perspective on the planet has been proven over and over again since the first photographs of the Earth from space were taken and spread across the globe. With the advent of satellite remote sensing the possibilities of layered and detailed information about the Earth increased, and nations and organizations strived to access both the technology and the subsequent data. These endeavours were in no way without interest in the resources, which in this way could be discovered and developed. On the contrary, some were explicitly aimed at making extraction possible. In other cases, the resource interest was more entangled, stressing the monitoring side of the practise in order to plan for crops or to avoid draughts or other catastrophes.

This chapter takes the remote sensing system SPOT – a French–Swedish–Belgian collaboration with the first launch in 1986 – to illustrate how resource interests were grouped and sorted through the means of this planetary technology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2019, 1. p. 124-142
Series
Routledge Environmental Humanities
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252281ISBN: 978-0-8153-4666-1 (print)ISBN: 978-1-351-17024-6 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-252281DiVA, id: diva2:1317952
Note

QC 20190819

Available from: 2019-05-24 Created: 2019-05-24 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved

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Wormbs, NinaGärdebo, Johan

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  • de-DE
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More languages
Output format
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