Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Management of chemical risk through occupational exposure limits
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3799-4814
2009 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs) are used as an important regulatory instrument to protect workers’ health from adverse effects of chemical exposures. The OELs mirror the outcome of the risk assessment and risk management performed by the standard setting actor. In paper I the OELs established by 18 different organisations or national regulatory agencies from the industrialised world were compared. The comparison concerned: (1) what chemicals have been selected and (2) the average level of exposure limits for all chemicals. In paper II the OELs established by 7 different national regulatory agencies of EU member states are compared to those of the European Commission (EC). In addition to the same comparisons as performed in the first study a comparison level was introduced (3) the similarity between the OELs of these EU member states and the OELs recommended by the EC.

List of OELs were collected through the web-pages of, and e-mail communication with the standard-setting agencies. The selection of agencies was determined by availability of the lists. The database of paper I contains OELs for a total of 1341 substances; of these 25 substances have OELs from all 18 organisations while more than one third of the substances are only regulated by one organisation alone. In paper II this database was narrowed down to the European perspective.  The average level of OELs differs substantially between organisations; the US OSHA exposure limits are (on average) nearly 40 % higher than those of Poland. Also within Europe there was a nearly as large difference. The average level of lists tends to decrease over time, although there are exceptions to this. The similarity index in paper II indicates that the exposure limits of EU member states are converging towards the European Commission’s recommended OELs. These two studies also showed that OELs for the same substance can vary significantly between different standard-setters. The work presented in paper III identifies steps in the risk assessment that could account for these differences. Substances for which the level of OELs vary by a factor of 100 or more were identified and their documentation sought for further scrutiny. Differences in the identification of the critical effect could explain the different level of the OELs for half of the substances. The results reported in paper III also confirm the tendency of older OELs generally being higher. Furthermore, several OELs were more than 30 years old and were based on out-dated knowledge. But the age of the data review could not account for all the differences in data selection, only one fifth of the documents referred to all available key studies. Also the evaluation of the key studies varied significantly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH , 2009. , viii, 22 p.
Series
These in Risk and Safety from the Division of Philosophy at the Royal Institute of Technology, ISSN 1654-627X
Keyword [en]
occupational exposure limit, risk assessment, risk management, chemicals regulation, regulatory toxicology, European Union
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-9769ISBN: 978-91-7415-206-7 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-9769DiVA: diva2:132945
Presentation
2009-02-09, Rum 231, Teknikringen 78, KTH, Stockholm, 15:56 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-01-26 Created: 2008-12-10 Last updated: 2011-02-15Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Occupational Exposure Limits: A Comparative Study
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational Exposure Limits: A Comparative Study
2008 (English)In: Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology, ISSN 0273-2300, E-ISSN 1096-0295, Vol. 50, no 2, 261-270 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Occupational exposure limits (OELs) are used as an important regulatory instrument to protect workers' health from adverse effects of chemical exposures. The OELs mirror the outcome of the risk assessment and risk management performed by the standard setting actor. In this study we compared the OELs established by 18 different organisations or national regulatory agencies. The OELs were compared with respect to: (1) what chemicals have been selected and (2) the average level of exposure limits for all chemicals. Our database contains OELs for a total of 1341 substances; of these 25 substances have OELs from all 18 organisations while more than one-third of the substances are only regulated by one organisation. The average level of the exposure limits has declined during the past 10 years for 6 of the 8 organisations in our study for which historical data were available; it has increased for Poland and remained nearly unchanged for Sweden. The average level of OELs differs substantially between organisations; the US OSHA exposure limits are (on average) nearly 40 % higher than those of Poland. The scientific or policy-related motivations for these differences remain to be analysed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2008
Keyword
occupational exposure limits, risk assessment, risk management, chemicals regulation, ACGIH
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-9766 (URN)10.1016/j.yrtph.2007.12.004 (DOI)000254036000021 ()2-s2.0-39149085645 (Scopus ID)
Note
QC 20101101Available from: 2008-12-10 Created: 2008-12-10 Last updated: 2011-02-15Bibliographically approved
2. Are occupational exposure limits becoming more alike within the European Union?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are occupational exposure limits becoming more alike within the European Union?
2008 (English)In: Journal of Applied Toxicology, ISSN 0260-437X, E-ISSN 1099-1263, Vol. 28, no 7, 858-866 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by seven different national regulatory agencies of EU member states are compared with those of the European Commission (EC). The comparison concerned: (1) what chemicals have been selected, (2) the average level of exposure limits for all chemicals, and (3) the similarity between the OELs of different EU member states and the OELs recommended by the European Commission. The average level of the exposure limits has declined during the past 10 years in four of the live countries in our study for which historical data were available to us. Poland has not changed its level noticeably and Germany has increased it. Since the first list of indicative OELs was established by the EC, a few of the EU exposure limits have been lowered. The similarity index indicates that the exposure limits of EU member states are converging towards the European Commission's recommended OELs. Still, the average level of OELs differs between organizations - the Estonian OELs are on average 35% higher than the Polish OELs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley InterScience, 2008
Keyword
occupational exposure limits, risk management, harmonization, European Union, chemicals regulation
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-9767 (URN)10.1002/jat.1349 (DOI)000260072900005 ()2-s2.0-55449123487 (Scopus ID)
Note
QC 20101101Available from: 2008-12-10 Created: 2008-12-10 Last updated: 2011-02-15Bibliographically approved
3. Use of primary data in risk assessment for occupational exposure limits
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of primary data in risk assessment for occupational exposure limits
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Keyword
Assessment factor, regulatory toxicology, risk assessment, risk management, safety factor
National Category
Philosophy Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-9768 (URN)
Note

QC 20110215

Available from: 2008-12-10 Created: 2008-12-10 Last updated: 2016-03-16Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(85 kB)681 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 85 kBChecksum SHA-512
3f974e91038305fc24b4c8c358f4dbca43c70283151ae3e5637ddcc04751b8a147ead540dcc53a72af44a50616686f86f94ed190bb57aa4d5fadb5c3ea637a99
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Authority records BETA

Schenk, Linda

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Schenk, Linda
By organisation
Philosophy
Pharmacology and Toxicology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 681 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 534 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf