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Are smart city projects catalyzing urban energy sustainability?
Department of Geography & Centre for Climate and Energy Transformation, University of Bergen, PO Box 7802, 5020, Bergen, Norway.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. Oslo Metropolitan University, PO Box 4 St., Olavs Plass, 0130, Oslo, Norway.
2019 (English)In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, p. 918-925Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the links between smart cities and urban energy sustainability. Because achieving a “smart city” is a wide agenda rather than a specific set of interventions, smartness itself cannot easily be measured or quantifiably assessed. Instead, we understand smart cities to be a broad framework of strategies pursued by urban actors, and ask whether and how smart city projects catalyze urban energy sustainability. We use case studies of three cities (Nottingham, Stavanger, and Stockholm) funded by the Horizon 2020 Smart Cities and Communities program and examine how urban energy sustainability was advanced and realized through the smart city initiatives. We find first that while sustainability is not always a major objective of local implementation of smart city projects, the smartness agenda nevertheless increases the ambition to achieve energy sustainability targets. Second, the sustainability measures in smart cities are rarely driven by advanced technology, even though the smart city agenda is framed around such innovations. Third, there is significant sustainability potential in cross-sectoral integration, but there are unresolved challenges of accountability for and measurability of these gains.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2019. p. 918-925
Keywords [en]
European Union, Framing, Smart city, Sustainability, Urbanism, Regional planning, Sustainable development, Advanced technology, Energy sustainability, Horizon 2020, Sustainability-potential, Urban energy, accountability, innovation, England, Norway, Nottingham [England], Nottingham [Nottingham (ADS)], Rogaland, Stavanger, Stockholm [Stockholm (CNT)], Stockholm [Sweden], Sweden, United Kingdom
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252466DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2019.03.001ISI: 000468012900083Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85062621770OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-252466DiVA, id: diva2:1337461
Note

QC 20190715

Available from: 2019-07-15 Created: 2019-07-15 Last updated: 2019-07-15Bibliographically approved

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Wullf Wathne, Marikken

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CiteExportLink to record
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