Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Environmental pressure from Swedish consumption - The largest contributing producer countries, products and services
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4389-8984
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Stockholm Environment Institute, Box 24218, Stockholm, 10451, Sweden.
NTNU, Dept Energy & Proc Engn, Program Ind Ecol, Trondheim, Norway..
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5600-0726
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 231, p. 698-713Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to produce goods and services that are consumed in Sweden, natural resources are extracted and pollutants are emitted in many other countries. This paper presents an analysis of the goods and services consumed in Sweden that cause the largest environmental pressures in terms of resource use and emissions, identifying in which countries or regions these pressures occur. The results have been calculated using a hybrid model developed in the PRINCE project combining the multi-regional input-output database EXIOBASE with data from the Swedish economic and environmental accounts. The following environmental pressures are analysed: Use of Land, Water and Material resources, Emissions of Greenhouse gases (GHG), Sulphur dioxides (SO2), Nitrogen oxides (NOx), and Particulate Matters (PM 2.5 and 10). The product groups are those goods and services bought for private or public consumption and capital investments, as listed in the Swedish economic accounts. The results show that Sweden is a net importer of all embodied environmental pressures, except for land use and material use. The most important product groups across environmental pressures are construction, food products and direct emissions from households (except for sulphur dioxide emissions and material use for the latter). Other product groups that are found to have environmental pressures across several indicators are wholesale and retail services, architecture and engineering, dwellings, motor vehicles and machinery and equipment. However, for the three natural resource pressures Use of Water, Land and Material resources, agricultural products are a relatively important product group along with products from forestry for the last two indicators. A considerable proportion of the environmental pressure occurs in Sweden, but when comparing those of domestic origin and that occurring internationally, the majority of all pressures for Swedish consumption occur abroad (except for land use). Other countries stand out as particularly important as origins of pressure for Swedish consumption, most notably China, which is among the top five countries for emissions to air, as well as blue water and material use. Other highly relevant countries or regions are Rest of Asia and Pacific (i.e. Asia and Pacific except Indonesia, Taiwan, Australia, India, South Korea, China and Japan), Russia, Germany as well as Denmark and Spain for certain product groups and environmental pressure combinations. This pattern of geographically spread pressures caused by Swedish consumption indicates the need for addressing the pressures at various levels of collaboration: national, within the European Union, bilateral and international.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 231, p. 698-713
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255353DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.05.148ISI: 000474680100059Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85066270262OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-255353DiVA, id: diva2:1339563
Note

QC 20190730

Available from: 2019-07-30 Created: 2019-07-30 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Sustainable consumption for policymakers: measuring, learning and acting
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable consumption for policymakers: measuring, learning and acting
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Current patterns and levels of consumption are a key driver of unsustainable resource use and pollution, which contributes to global environmental degradation. Rapid reductions in environmental pressures are required to avoid irreversible loss of fragile ecosystems and social and economic crises. Consumption must become sustainable. Governments have an essential role to play in delivering this. The aim of this thesis is to examine three aspects of the policymaking process on sustainable consumption – measuring, learning and acting – and the links between them. Each aspect has a linked objective.

  1. Measuring: Assess existing and novel techniques for calculating the environmental pressures of consumption that enable government to measure and monitor a country’s progress towards sustainable consumption
  2. Learning: Determine whether – and, if so, how – consumption-based indicators might better support policymaker learning on sustainable consumption
  3. Acting: Identify ways in which governments can enhance their actions to support sustainable consumption

The research is presented in six papers and organised in three parts: one for each objective. Parts 1 and 2 investigate current and future opportunities for policymakers to measure the environmental pressures linked to their country’s consumption, what these mean for achieving sustainable consumption and whether consumption-based indicators support learning about sustainable consumption. These parts are based on the Swedish experience of sustainable consumption. Part 3 examines various sustainable consumption interventions and what these could mean for government action in the future. This part draws on examples from several countries. Qualitative and quantitative methods are used to answer these questions. These comprise systematic review and mapping, macro-environment economic modelling and analysis, interviews, workshops and focus groups.

The results provide a number of insights. First, novel consumption-based measurements for Sweden highlight the scale of the challenge involved in achieving sustainable consumption and the importance of increasing the policy applicability of indicators. Second, while indicators provide some learning for policymakers, their contribution to changing existing practices and navigating political or institutional barriers is limited. The learning potential of indicators is constrained by institutional environments. Instead, learning must be structured and enabled by institutions. Third, with regard to the actions studied, increased government involvement appears a necessary and, to some actors, desirable option. Nonetheless, a number of barriers to and enabling factors for policy action to promote sustainable consumption must be considered. In terms of the connections between the three elements of measuring, learning and acting, what might first appear to be a linear relationship is in reality far more complex. Measurement does not necessarily lead to learning – and learning is not always followed by action. Policymakers act without the level of knowledge they would like while indicators remain unused and, in some cases, are even rejected. Learning comes from practitioners’ involvement in action, as well as research into the actions themselves, the problem and solutions. Understanding government efforts on measuring, learning and action to promote sustainable consumption offers insights into how these multiple factors might contribute, separately and together, to more sustainable consumption.

Abstract [sv]

Nuvarande konsumtionsmönster och konsumtionsnivåer är huvudsakliga drivkrafter bakom ohållbar användning av naturresurser och förorening vilka bidrar till global miljöförstöring. En snabb minskning av negativ miljöpåverkan är nödvändig för att undvika en irreversibel förlust av känsliga ekosystem och socio-ekonomisk kris. Konsumtionen måste därför bli mer hållbar och myndigheter har en viktig roll att spela för att uppnå detta mål. Syftet med denna avhandling är att undersöka tre aspekter av beslutsfattandeprocesser kring hållbar konsumtion – mätning av miljöpåverkan, lärande och åtgärder – samt kopplingarna mellan dessa. Varje aspekt är kopplad till ett mål;

  1. Mätning av miljöpåverkan: Utvärdering av existerande och nya metoder för beräkning av miljöpåverkan kopplad till konsumtion som möjliggör för myndigheter att mäta och följa upp en nations åtgärder för att uppnå hållbar konsumtion
  2. Lärande: Fastställande av ifall och på vilket sätt konsumtionsbaserade indikatorer kan vara ett bättre stöd för beslutsfattare i lärandeprocessen kring hållbar konsumtion
  3. Åtgärder: Identifiering av på vilka sätt myndigheter kan förstärka och förbättra sina åtgärder för att stödja en mer hållbar konsumtion

Forskningen presenteras i sex artiklar och är uppdelad i tre delar, en för varje mål. Del 1 och 2 undersöker nuvarande och framtida möjligheter för beslutsfattare att mäta miljöpåverkan kopplad till nationell konsumtion, vad dessa möjligheter innebär för att uppnå målet om hållbar konsumtion samt ifall användning av konsumtionsbaserade indikatorer stödjer lärande kring hållbar konsumtion. De två första delarna är baserade på svensk erfarenhet av arbete kring hållbar konsumtion. Den tredje delen undersöker en rad interventioner framtagna för att uppnå hållbar konsumtion, och vad dessa kan innebära för myndigheters agerande i framtiden. Denna del bygger på exempel från ett flertal länder. Kvalitativa och kvantitativa metoder används för att besvara frågeställningarna. Dessa omfattar bland annat systematisk granskning, sammanställning och kartläggning av existerande forskning, miljö-ekonomisk modellering och analys, intervjuer, workshops och konsultationer i fokusgrupper.

Resultaten i denna avhandling bidrar med ett flertal insikter. Först, belyser nya fotavtrycksberäkningar för Sverige omfattningen av utmaningen att uppnå hållbar konsumtion samt vikten av att öka indikatorers tillämpbarhet för beslutsfattandeprocesser. För det andra visar resultaten att även om indikatorer kan bidra med ett visst lärande för beslutsfattare är deras bidrag till att förändra nuvarande tillvägagångssätt och navigera politiska och institutionella hinder begränsad. Potentialen för att de skall bidra till ett ökat lärande kring hållbar konsumtion är dessutom begränsad av den institutionella omgivningen. Kunskapsuppbyggnad och lärande måste istället struktureras och möjliggöras genom institutioner. Slutligen belyser forskningen att en ökad inblandning av myndigheter verkar vara en nödvändig, och av vissa aktörer en önskvärd lösning. Med detta sagt finns det ett antal barriärer och möjliggörande faktorer som måste övervägas vid beslutsfattande för att lyckas främja hållbar konsumtion.

När det gäller sambanden mellan de tre elementen som studerats i denna avhandling; mätning av miljöpåverkan, lärande och åtgärder, är det som först kan tyckas vara linjära relationer mer komplexa. Mätning av miljöpåverkan leder inte nödvändigtvis till lärandeivoch en lärandeprocess följs inte alltid av åtgärder. Beslutsfattare agerar utan den kunskapsnivå de egentligen eftersträvar och indikatorer förblir oanvända och i vissa fall till och med avfärdade. Kunskap och lärande byggs upp genom att utövare tvingas till handling, och att själva agerandet, problemet och lösningarna i sin tur studeras. En ökad förståelse av myndigheters insatser för mätning av miljöpåverkan, lärande och agerande för att främja hållbar konsumtion erbjuder insikter i hur dessa tre faktorer kan bidra, både separat och tillsammans, till en mer hållbar konsumtion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2019. p. 67
Series
TRITA-ABE-DLT ; 1926
Keywords
Sustainable consumption, environmental pressures, consumption-based indicators, footprint, policymaker, measuring, learning, action, Sweden
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-263838 (URN)978-91-7873-362-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-12-06, F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20191115

Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Fauré, EléonoreFinnveden, GöranPalm, Viveka

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Fauré, EléonoreDawkins, ElenaFinnveden, GöranPalm, Viveka
By organisation
Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering
In the same journal
Journal of Cleaner Production
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 53 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf