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Undetected Dysglycemia Is an Important Risk Factor for Two Common Diseases, Myocardial Infarction and Periodontitis: A Report From the PAROKRANK Study
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden. orhammar, Anna.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4467-0132
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2019 (English)In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 1504-1511Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Information on the relationship among dysglycemia (prediabetes or diabetes), myocardial infarction (MI), and periodontitis (PD) is limited. This study tests the hypothesis that undetected dysglycemia is associated with both conditions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The PAROKRANK (Periodontitis and Its Relation to Coronary Artery Disease) study included 805 patients with a first MI and 805 matched control subjects. All participants without diabetes (91%) were examined with an oral glucose tolerance test. Abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) (impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes) was categorized according to the World Health Organization. Periodontal status was categorized from dental X-rays as healthy (≥80% remaining alveolar bone height), moderate (79-66%), or severe (<66%) PD. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs were calculated by logistic regression and were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, education, marital status, and explored associated risks of dysglycemia to PD and MI, respectively. RESULTS: AGT was more common in patients than in control subjects (32% vs. 19%; P < 0.001) and was associated with MI (OR 2.03; 95% CI 1.58-2.60). Undetected diabetes was associated with severe PD (2.50; 1.36-4.63) and more strongly in patients (2.35; 1.15-4.80) than in control subjects (1.80; 0.48-6.78), but not when categorized as AGT (total cohort: 1.07; 0.67-1.72). Severe PD was most frequent in subjects with undetected diabetes, and reversely undetected diabetes was most frequent in patients with severe PD. CONCLUSIONS: In this large case-control study previously undetected dysglycemia was independently associated to both MI and severe PD. In principal, it doubled the risk of a first MI and of severe PD. This supports the hypothesis that dysglycemia drives two common diseases, MI and PD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NLM (Medline) , 2019. Vol. 42, no 8, p. 1504-1511
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Endocrinology and Diabetes
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URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255735DOI: 10.2337/dc19-0018ISI: 000476786200024PubMedID: 31182493Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85070184039OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-255735DiVA, id: diva2:1342194
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QC 20190813

Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved

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