Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Prompting arm activity after stroke: A clinical proof of concept study of wrist-worn accelerometers with a vibrating alert function
Newcastle Univ, Inst Neurosci, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
Newcastle Univ, Sch Comp Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
Newcastle Univ, Inst Neurosci, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
Newcastle Univ, Inst Neurosci, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION AND ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGIES ENGINEERING, ISSN 2055-6683, Vol. 5, article id UNSP 2055668318761524Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Frequent practice of functional movements after stroke may optimise motor recovery; however, it is challenging for patients to remember to integrate an impaired limb into daily activities. We report the activity responses of stroke patients receiving a vibrating alert delivered by a tri-axial accelerometer wristband to prompt movement of the impaired arm if hourly activity levels fell. Methods: Adults with upper limb impairment <= 28 days post-stroke wore the device for four weeks. Therapists and patients reviewed movement activity data twice weekly to agree ongoing rehabilitation activities and programme the wristband with a personalised prompt threshold (median baseline activity + 5%, 25% or 50%). Results: Seven patients completed the programme (five males; meanstandard deviation (age) 64 +/- 5 years; days post-stroke 13 +/- 7; baseline/four-week Action Research Arm Test median (Interquartile range (IQR)) 39 (8, 44)/56 (11, 57)). Wristbands were worn for 89% of programme duration. A total of 1,288 prompts were delivered, with a median of four (IQR 3,7) prompts per patient per day. Mean activity increases following a prompt ranged from 11% to 29%. Conclusions: Feedback delivered by a programmable accelerometer increased impaired arm activity. Improvements are required in device reliability before conducting a pragmatic clinical trial to examine the impact upon recovery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC , 2018. Vol. 5, article id UNSP 2055668318761524
Keywords [en]
Stroke rehabilitation, arm, accelerometry, feedback, activity
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239667DOI: 10.1177/2055668318761524ISI: 000427042000001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-239667DiVA, id: diva2:1350895
Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-12

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text
Human Computer Interaction

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 1 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf