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The Blowhole: Posthumanist reflections on interspecies communication, listening, and the aesthetics of more-than-human relations
Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. (The Posthumanities Hub)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3405-0335
2019 (English)In: RE:SOUND, the 8th International Conference for Histories of Media Arts 2019, Aalborg, Denmark, 20-22 Aug, 2019., 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

Sounds are leaky phenomena, pointing to the unavoidable entanglement of bodies, technologies and environs. A captured sound is a record of loss, as is the archive. This loss urges me – as artist, researcher, and listener – to story and restory entanglements. While the media might be fixed, listening is fluid and dynamic. And a sonic sensibility, I find, holds the potential to counteract a reductive, visual-textual logic and its related knowledge formations.

This journey into a predominantly sonic ecology departs from the unique archival material of American neurophysiologist John C. Lilly. In the 1950s and 1960s Lilly conducted controversial scientific experiments with dolphins, as well as on himself. I will focus on an aspect previously not discussed in relation to Lilly's dolphin research, the role of listening and the use of sound technology, and I will attend to Lilly's experimental set-ups as media ecologies. The encounter with an animal "voice" and the attempts to record this phenomena as sound objects would force Lilly into uncharted territories. When the recordings of words uttered by dolphins were played back to other researchers, they didn't hear what Lilly's team had heard. As Lilly began experimenting with sound, it seemed as neither technology nor perception could be relied on. Even the role of language in the act of communication became increasingly elusive.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
sound archives, sonic sensibility, animal voice, listening, entanglements, more-than-human relations, interspecies communication, m/Others, posthumanism, feminist new materialism
National Category
Visual Arts Music
Research subject
Art, Technology and Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-260306OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-260306DiVA, id: diva2:1355120
Conference
RE:SOUND, MAH2019
Funder
Helge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-09-26

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf