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How employees engage with B2B brands on social media: Word choice and verbal tone
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
Kings Coll London, Kings Business Sch, London, England..ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0354-9707
Univ Stellenbosch, Sch Business, Stellenbosch, South Africa..
Simon Fraser Univ, Beedie Sch Business, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
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2019 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 81, p. 130-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marketing scholars and practitioners are keenly interested in brand engagement in social media because brand engagement has strong links to brand equity. However, much of the marketing literature focuses on customer brand engagement and often in a consumer market setting. This paper advances this literature in two ways by (1) focusing on employees, not customers, as important stakeholders who frequently engage with brands on social media, and by (2) observing brand engagement in a business-to-business context. We develop a conceptual framework based on a theory of word choice and verbal tone to understand the content of engagement observations (i.e., reviews) that breaks into five content dimensions-activity, optimism, certainty, realism, commonality-and four calculated dimensions-insistence, embellishment, variety, and complexity. Then, we examine over 6300 job reviews authored by employees of B2B firms to explore the differences in the way employees engage with both highly-ranked, and-rated brands versus low-ranked and-rated brands. We find that there are significant differences in nearly all the theoretical dimensions, yet the effect sizes are much larger between high versus low review ratings compared to high versus low B2B brand ranking. We close with some important managerial implications and future research directions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC , 2019. Vol. 81, p. 130-137
Keywords [en]
B2B brand engagement, Employee-based brand equity, Social media engagement, Review content analysis, Word choice and verbal tone
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-261340DOI: 10.1016/j.indmarman.2017.09.012ISI: 000486357200013Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85034608422OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-261340DiVA, id: diva2:1358192
Note

QC 20191007

Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved

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Pitt, Christine

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